Go Back   Airline Pilot Central Forums - Find your next job as a Pilot > >
Regional Regional airlines
 

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ. Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free.


User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-06-2006, 07:28 PM   #1  
Gets Weekends Off
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Sitting down and facing front. Why would you want to know that?
Posts: 520
Default Regional vs. instructing

I have noticed that the longer a CFI instructs, the more picky he is about what airlines they would apply to. I still fairly new to instructing, but I am wondering if anyone has any input on instructing for another year and building hours vs. trying to get an airline job sooner than later. I am not talking about GoJets or Mesa, but perhaps Big Sky or another airline that will hire at 500-600 hours TT (I currently only have 40 Multi, bummer) that would be okay to work at for a few years or so. It seems like flying a turboprop would be better time spent than instructing out of a 152, and that could get the PIC turbine faster as well. I guess that I am not seeing why someone would opt to instruct for a long time instead of going to a regional. Perhaps to get on to a "better" airline like ExpressJet or SkyWest instead of BigSky?
WhiteH2O is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 07:34 PM   #2  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Jul 2006
Position: Soon to be Ex Dash-Trash
Posts: 258
Default

Get 135 minimums then fly freight for a year or so. You will get turbine PIC at most carriers and your airline interviews will be much easier after you get some real world flying experience. You will have a great time as well. Don't rush to get into a regional, it isn't that great.
crjav8er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 08:02 PM   #3  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Space Monkey's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Mar 2006
Position: Red Tail CRJ CA
Posts: 262
Default

BTW Shaun Kudos to you for earning your job and not just paying people off like a GOD [email protected] Academy Puke.... Keep up the good work man....
Space Monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 08:38 PM   #4  
Prime Minister/Moderator
 
rickair7777's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Engines Turn Or People Swim
Posts: 22,404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
I have noticed that the longer a CFI instructs, the more picky he is about what airlines they would apply to. I still fairly new to instructing, but I am wondering if anyone has any input on instructing for another year and building hours vs. trying to get an airline job sooner than later. I am not talking about GoJets or Mesa, but perhaps Big Sky or another airline that will hire at 500-600 hours TT (I currently only have 40 Multi, bummer) that would be okay to work at for a few years or so. It seems like flying a turboprop would be better time spent than instructing out of a 152, and that could get the PIC turbine faster as well. I guess that I am not seeing why someone would opt to instruct for a long time instead of going to a regional. Perhaps to get on to a "better" airline like ExpressJet or SkyWest instead of BigSky?

If you've ruled out go-jets and mesa you're on the right track. The pain and hassle of ANY 121 training program is significant. I probably wouldn't do a big sky unless they have a base in your hometime. Wait until you can get into a decent regional with geography that is good for you.

A small turbo-prop only regional might be useful for quick PIC, but that PIC will only be useful if you have a good connection at a major that is hiring (or soon will be). SWA airlines will interview just about anyone with 1800-2000 121 PIC, but they interview many and hire few. If you go through all that and get burned out as a Big Sky captain in 3 years you'll end up applying to those same big regionals that you could have done as a 1200 hour CFI...
rickair7777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 08:39 PM   #5  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Pilotpip's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Jun 2005
Position: Retired
Posts: 2,925
Default

I think I'm going to go the route that crjav8er mentioned. A bunch of CFI's at my school got hired recently and I probably could have gone with them but decided against it for a couple reasons. First, I didn't want to work for the company they went to. Second, I'm really liking instucting and would make a career out of it if it paid better. Third, at 500 hours I feel that I have a lot to learn before blasting around in an RJ with 50 people's lives depending on me. I'd rather wait and have a chance at a better regional. First year pay sucks, I don't want to spend two years on it.

The FBO I used to work at handled a lot of 135 ops and the flying sort of appeals to me. It's tough, it's potentially dangerous, but it will make you a damn good pilot. I think I'll do that for a couple years and try to move to a fractional or something. Then again, I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.
Pilotpip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 08:57 PM   #6  
Gets Weekends Off
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Sitting down and facing front. Why would you want to know that?
Posts: 520
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickair7777 View Post
If you go through all that and get burned out as a Big Sky captain in 3 years you'll end up applying to those same big regionals that you could have done as a 1200 hour CFI...
True, however, I will be able to apply to any regional and have a fair chance at getting hired. I will also have to work fewer years at the better regional before I go after a major job. After a few years as a CFI I will have total time, but my multi will still be lacking. Also, I will make more as a regional pilot than as a CFI. If I have enough time for a 135 operation, I would rather go into a regional. It seems like an unnecisary step to me.

I guess I am trying to look long term. What route will get me to where I want to be the fastest. Maybe that is the wrong way to look at it? It seems that I could go to a lesser regional, then go to a better regional for a while after that to build the time for a major, and it would be better than instructing for another few years (while paying for more multi time, very few multi students around here) and then just barely having mins for the better regionals.

Anyone who went into a regional with low time and would have instructed longer if they were able to do it again?
WhiteH2O is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 08:59 PM   #7  
Gets Weekends Off
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Sitting down and facing front. Why would you want to know that?
Posts: 520
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Space Monkey View Post
BTW Shaun Kudos to you for earning your job and not just paying people off like a GOD [email protected] Academy Puke.... Keep up the good work man....
Thanks, Space Monkey
WhiteH2O is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2006, 11:58 PM   #8  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: May 2006
Position: Student Pilot
Posts: 782
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
I have noticed that the longer a CFI instructs, the more picky he is about what airlines they would apply to. I still fairly new to instructing, but I am wondering if anyone has any input on instructing for another year and building hours vs. trying to get an airline job sooner than later. I am not talking about GoJets or Mesa, but perhaps Big Sky or another airline that will hire at 500-600 hours TT (I currently only have 40 Multi, bummer) that would be okay to work at for a few years or so. It seems like flying a turboprop would be better time spent than instructing out of a 152, and that could get the PIC turbine faster as well. I guess that I am not seeing why someone would opt to instruct for a long time instead of going to a regional. Perhaps to get on to a "better" airline like ExpressJet or SkyWest instead of BigSky?
I've known such instructors too - they meet or exceed mins for many regionals, but choose to hold out. Somebody explained to me one reason for this is because let's say you have 700 TT, get an interview with XYZ Regional, get hired by XYZ, and then class gets canceled/you get furloughed/etc etc. Then you're stuck in a bad place.. you already quit your CFI job, and don't quite have enough hours to be competitive to a whole lot of other jobs out there. So some people would rather wait until they have a good amount of hours under their belt, say 1500. A security thing, I guess.

And another small reason would be the pay.. I guess it depends on where you teach, but if you work at some large aviation universities (or even some busy FBOs), you actually take a pay cut the first year or two of getting onto a regional.
kalyx522 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2006, 12:43 AM   #9  
Day puke
 
FlyJSH's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Feb 2006
Position: Out.
Posts: 3,825
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by crjav8er View Post
Get 135 minimums then fly freight for a year or so. You will get turbine PIC at most carriers and your airline interviews will be much easier after you get some real world flying experience. You will have a great time as well. Don't rush to get into a regional, it isn't that great.
I second that.

I have gone the non-regional route. I have not qualified for food stamps since I left flight instruction

But, as an outsider, the only thing I have regreted is not making as many quality contacts (it seems) as those who went the regional route, but I was always a bit hard headed and wanted to earn the job on my qualificatiion vice who I know.

Good luck and keep your chin up. Honest work will win (sorry for the protestant work ethic thing).

j
FlyJSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2006, 03:13 AM   #10  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,844
Default

Having interviewed with Big Sky myself, I'd say go work for them if you can. They've got a lot of great flying going on out there, and it seems like a fun bunch of people. Additionally, they plan on doubling their operation within the next year, so there's some room for growth there.
As far as burning bridges by quitting your CFI job to go fly for a regional, this doesn't always have to be the case. If you explain the situation to your employer, there's a good chance they'd be more than happy to hire you back on if the airline pilot thing doesn't work out - especially if you did good work.
POPA is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
 

 
Reply
 



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Regional Airline Academy MSRVPILOT Flight Schools and Training 15 11-13-2014 09:49 AM
Northwest to buy 72 regional jets ryane946 Major 12 10-09-2006 05:52 PM
Delta Solicits Regional Jet Service ryane946 Major 46 09-21-2006 09:58 AM
ATP's Regional Jet Standards Certification? pilotrod Regional 28 02-01-2006 03:46 PM
Other civil routes to Airlines beside instructing chuckc Flight Schools and Training 11 11-10-2005 05:10 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:42 AM.


vBulletin® v3.9.3.5, Copyright ©2000-2019, MH Sub I, LLC dba vBulletin
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.3.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Website Copyright 2000 - 2017 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1