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Old 08-17-2023, 08:01 PM
  #21  
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Don't bother going out to buy an airbus type rating. I've known too many over the years who bought a type, hoping it would help, and it did not. If the airline wants to hire you, they'll type you, and they'll do that regardless of your type rating.

The issue won't really be which aircraft is more difficult. If you're up to the task, then it's not a matter of difficulty; no aircraft you hire into should be difficult. If you find the process difficult, it may indicate that you weren't proficient enough to begin the training in the first place. Depending on the program, it may be more challenging insofar as the amount of material you get vs. the time you get, but airlines have established programs for the average student which are paced and timed to enable getting through without difficulty, so long as one is diligent in study. This assumes, of course, that one shoes up proficient and ready. The challenge level may increase if one is rusty or weak. Best bet, be ready to hit the ground running, which means show up proficient (at instruments, flying, etc).

The training ground is fairly similar regardless of where you hire on; you're learning the aircraft type, and how to operate that type the company way. Learn the memory items, the procedures, and the call-outs, and you've knocked out most of the battle, no matter where you go. Again, however, it's easiest to do that if you're proficient and you are vigilant about the training material; go into the sim with everything internalized and memorized, so that all you need to do is focus on applying it. If your study habits aren't in line with dropping everything in your world and focusing on training for two months, around the clock, and if you're not proficient in your flying and instrument procedures, then it will be more challenging.

Keep in mind that with the current pilot record-keeping system, the PRD or pilot record database, it's a lifetime record, not just a few years into the past, so anything you do will stay with you for the rest of your career. The PRD is required to not only record training history (failures, etc), but even tracks training that you started and didn't finish. That means if you start with a company and decide it's not for you, then while you don't have a training failure on your hands, it's still a record of incomplete training that every future employer will see.

Operators like Ameriflight do hire at lower experience levels, and you'll end up flying IFR, often at night, single pilot, but while it's good in terms of perhaps being a place to start, it also puts you in a position where the penalties are very real if you screw up. Night freight single pilot IFR with no autopilot is the real deal...
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Old 08-18-2023, 08:39 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Concorde001 View Post
Yes, ATP, CL-65 type, 150h on type but it was 8 years ago. About 1800 h total, Engineering degree.
Thinking about coming back and debating options:
1. regional (very limited hiring), part 135 or cargo such as Ameriflight
Those would have training programs more adapted to low experience. Training 135 probably isn't as consistent as 121, although a large operator like amflight should be fine.

Originally Posted by Concorde001 View Post
2. ULCC but probably under qualified for that. Maybe getting a 320 type could increase chances?
Option 2 would be great but keep hearing of failures for pilots with not enough experience. Is the Airbus that much more difficult to learn and fly than the CRJ7/9?
I don't have a 121 failure and don't want to risk that, as ULCCs are more geared for pilots with experience. Maybe option 1 is safer.
Regardless, I know I will need to work super hard either way. Appreciate the input.
It's not normally done in the US but a bus type might help you get hired faster at an airbus ULCC. Or maybe not, there's not much precedent for that here. It would help you get through ground and sim training.

Bus is a different animal, it's easy to fly but I might say harder to learn than conventional aircraft just cuz it's weird. The nature and quality of the training program matters of course. Engineering degree will help.

Get current in 91, apply to ULCC and see what happens. They might like you because you're older and won't be competitive for DL/UA any time soon. Some ULCC are hiring CFI's I believe.
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Old 08-18-2023, 04:18 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by JohnBurke View Post
Don't bother going out to buy an airbus type rating. I've known too many over the years who bought a type, hoping it would help, and it did not. If the airline wants to hire you, they'll type you, and they'll do that regardless of your type rating.

The issue won't really be which aircraft is more difficult. If you're up to the task, then it's not a matter of difficulty; no aircraft you hire into should be difficult. If you find the process difficult, it may indicate that you weren't proficient enough to begin the training in the first place. Depending on the program, it may be more challenging insofar as the amount of material you get vs. the time you get, but airlines have established programs for the average student which are paced and timed to enable getting through without difficulty, so long as one is diligent in study. This assumes, of course, that one shoes up proficient and ready. The challenge level may increase if one is rusty or weak. Best bet, be ready to hit the ground running, which means show up proficient (at instruments, flying, etc).

The training ground is fairly similar regardless of where you hire on; you're learning the aircraft type, and how to operate that type the company way. Learn the memory items, the procedures, and the call-outs, and you've knocked out most of the battle, no matter where you go. Again, however, it's easiest to do that if you're proficient and you are vigilant about the training material; go into the sim with everything internalized and memorized, so that all you need to do is focus on applying it. If your study habits aren't in line with dropping everything in your world and focusing on training for two months, around the clock, and if you're not proficient in your flying and instrument procedures, then it will be more challenging.

Keep in mind that with the current pilot record-keeping system, the PRD or pilot record database, it's a lifetime record, not just a few years into the past, so anything you do will stay with you for the rest of your career. The PRD is required to not only record training history (failures, etc), but even tracks training that you started and didn't finish. That means if you start with a company and decide it's not for you, then while you don't have a training failure on your hands, it's still a record of incomplete training that every future employer will see.

Operators like Ameriflight do hire at lower experience levels, and you'll end up flying IFR, often at night, single pilot, but while it's good in terms of perhaps being a place to start, it also puts you in a position where the penalties are very real if you screw up. Night freight single pilot IFR with no autopilot is the real deal...
Thanks for the insights, JohnB.
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Old 08-18-2023, 04:27 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by rickair7777 View Post
Those would have training programs more adapted to low experience. Training 135 probably isn't as consistent as 121, although a large operator like amflight should be fine.



It's not normally done in the US but a bus type might help you get hired faster at an airbus ULCC. Or maybe not, there's not much precedent for that here. It would help you get through ground and sim training.

Bus is a different animal, it's easy to fly but I might say harder to learn than conventional aircraft just cuz it's weird. The nature and quality of the training program matters of course. Engineering degree will help.

Get current in 91, apply to ULCC and see what happens. They might like you because you're older and won't be competitive for DL/UA any time soon. Some ULCC are hiring CFI's I believe.
Appreciate the feedback Rickair. Since you mention ULCC training program, not sure if true but saw that Frontier's program is better than Spirit. But either way it all depends on the efforts and work put into it. I live close to big bases for both, so would be great options and career destinations for me.
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Old 08-18-2023, 04:49 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Mmonroe194 View Post
I am at a loss now. I'm sure you all get this a lot but I am not a great husband nor father but I'm getting so much grief for this now I am sorry anyone wasted time replying.

I have an interview Friday for the lift academy . I will def still participate. After that who knows.
FWIW, if you are truly having struggles at home, aviation will likely only make it worse.
Plenty of pilots contract Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome.
That aside, you are not the one wasting anyoneís time on here, as it is us wasting our own time
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