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Old 08-23-2010, 03:38 PM   #1  
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Default Help with Prop Governor Theory

I'm getting ready for my COMM SEL ride, and feel pretty much ready for most of the oral except for 1 thing-Prop governors. First off, I'm taking the ride in a 172, but we still need to know landing gear, prop governor, and pressurization systems (and feel free to let me know if I missed anything else). What I get so far about governors is this: props change pitch by means of oil pressure through the governor. In a single-engine, increased pressure=higher pitch/low RPM and vice-versa for decreased pressure. But I don't know where to go from there as far as explaining it for the oral. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
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Old 08-23-2010, 03:59 PM   #2  
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There are tons of resources via google, do a quick search.

Here's one I found: AIRCRAFT PROPELLER CONTROL AND OPERATION

Know normal ops and failure modes along with immediate actions for your check ride (and when you're flying the plane too of course).

I've been out of GA for a while, but don't you have to take a Comm. check in a complex aircraft?
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Old 08-23-2010, 04:05 PM   #3  
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HSLD's explanations are nice, and I would get out the Jeppesson explanation, read it a few times, explain it to the wall without looking at the book to make sure you have it. The main thing is to know what it is going to do if you lose oil pressure (low pitch), know the basics of how it works (such as the flyweights, springs, oil path, etc.) and what the aerodynamic advantages are to having one (pitch matched to airspeed mainly) and some disadvantages as well such as higher drag idling in the flare, higher nose weight, higher mx cost, oil leakage, and slightly reduced glide ratio come to mind. I think it would be good to know why we cycle the prop during a run-up also.
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Old 08-23-2010, 04:06 PM   #4  
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http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/a...83-3a-5of7.pdf

ch 11-3

come back if this doesn't answer your questions?
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:31 PM   #5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A320fan View Post
I'm getting ready for my COMM SEL ride, and feel pretty much ready for most of the oral except for 1 thing-Prop governors. First off, I'm taking the ride in a 172, but we still need to know landing gear, prop governor, and pressurization systems (and feel free to let me know if I missed anything else). What I get so far about governors is this: props change pitch by means of oil pressure through the governor. In a single-engine, increased pressure=higher pitch/low RPM and vice-versa for decreased pressure. But I don't know where to go from there as far as explaining it for the oral. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Not sure if this is much help... but most checkrides I've been on, the DPE's focused more on practical application of the systems... for example for single engine, when the prop "runs away" it could be good sign there is low oil pressure....visa versa for a twin, etc... plus knowing what oil pressure differences in climb/descent - straight/level mean.

Pressurization... if it's like any other commercial ride, it's doubtful they'll ask you much about that. But it's always good to know to basics... like if you loose pressure really fast at altitude - it can be a precarious situation.
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Old 08-24-2010, 03:33 AM   #6  
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Originally Posted by HSLD View Post
I've been out of GA for a while, but don't you have to take a Comm. check in a complex aircraft?
I think you can split the ride to save bucks. i.e. do most of the air work in a 172, then some pattern work in a complex to demonstrate the moving parts. I could be way off base, those brain cells are long gone.
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Old 08-24-2010, 07:31 AM   #7  
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Originally Posted by N9373M View Post
I think you can split the ride to save bucks. i.e. do most of the air work in a 172, then some pattern work in a complex to demonstrate the moving parts. I could be way off base, those brain cells are long gone.
You can split it up, DPE willing, but it adds time and complexity to the checkride as well as an extra pre-flight, taxi in/out, and another set of Mx logs to review. Seems to me the savings would not be worth it.
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Old 08-24-2010, 07:58 AM   #8  
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I split up (used two aircraft) during my initial CFI checkride and I wouldn't do it again. It was a pain in the butt for me and the examiner, made a long checkride even longer and when it was all said and done I bet I didn't save much money.
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Old 08-24-2010, 08:15 AM   #9  
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The (only) time when splitting up the aircraft used for the CFI ride is advantageous may be when the checkride is ended early due to weather, exam failure, or some other problem and it has to be continued.
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Old 08-24-2010, 11:26 AM   #10  
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Originally Posted by Cubdriver View Post
The (only) time when splitting up the aircraft used for the CFI ride is advantageous may be when the checkride is ended early due to weather, exam failure, or some other problem and it has to be continued.
It's not during the checkride that you save the money, it's doing the maneuvers training on the cheaper aircraft, especially if the complex aircraft that you have access to is especially expensive.

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