Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ. Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free.


User Tag List

Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-17-2010, 01:05 PM   #1  
New Hire
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Apr 2009
Posts: 4
Default Q about boosting my resume and dispat

I'm currently a Junior at a flight university, and I'm starting to look at ways to improve my resume, and set it apart from others.
I am currently enrolled in an A&P program while I work on my certificates.

My school offers a dispatch program, but if I went for it, it'd require an extra semester, which I'd like to avoid. I don't have the spare money to do it at ATP or something similar. I was reading the FARs and 65.57 states:
An applicant for an aircraft dispatcher certificate must present documentary evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he or she has the experience prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section or has accomplished the training described in paragraph (b) of this section as follows:
(a) A total of at least 2 years experience in the 3 years before the date of application, in any one or in any combination of the following areas:
(1) In military aircraft operations as a
(i) Pilot;
(ii) Flight navigator; or
(iii) Meteorologist.
(2) In aircraft operations conducted under part 121 of this chapter as
(i) An assistant in dispatching air carrier aircraft, under the direct supervision of a dispatcher certificated under this subpart;
(ii) A pilot;
(iii) A flight engineer; or
(iv) A meteorologist.
(3) In aircraft operations as
(i) An Air Traffic Controller; or
(ii) A Flight Service Specialist.
(4) In aircraft operations, performing other duties that the Administrator finds provide equivalent experience.
(b) A statement of graduation issued or revalidated in accordance with 65.70(b) of this part, showing that the person has successfully completed an approved aircraft dispatcher course.


What qualifies under section 4? I am currently working on my commercial licence, and an aviation degree. I think it may qualify, but I'm not sure. Would I just have to contact my local FSDO? Does anyone know a cheap way to get it (ha), like for example could I have a CFI with his dispatch sign me off? etc?

I've been trying to find info on this, and it seems that everything I find is about a flight school trying to get you to enroll.




Finally, what other things out there can help boost my resume? I want to start applying for internships, and I want to make it the best that it can be. Thanks!
josestolemycow is offline  
Old 11-17-2010, 01:18 PM   #2  
Prime Minister/Moderator
 
rickair7777's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Engines Turn Or People Swim
Posts: 24,931
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by josestolemycow View Post
What qualifies under section 4? I am currently working on my commercial licence, and an aviation degree. I think it may qualify, but I'm not sure.
If it were that easy, they would just come out and say so. That clause exists to allow the FAA some discretion, but they may not even use it. Someone affiliated with a dispatcher training program could tell you.

COMM training has nothing to do with dispatch. They want you to have experience in an organization where dispatch is a formal and legal part of flight operations, ie 121 or military. CarbHeat-Gas-Undercarriage-Mixture-Props-Seatbelts really doesn't give you any insight into those operations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by josestolemycow View Post
Finally, what other things out there can help boost my resume? I want to start applying for internships, and I want to make it the best that it can be. Thanks!
4-year degree and quality flight time: ME, IMC, Turbine, XC, 135, CFI, etc

An internship is golden...but DO NOT waste it at a regional. Do one at a major if at all possible. It's pretty easy to get hired by a regional.

Dispatch and A&P don't mean much in the airline world, if you had both most regional airlines would still rather hire a guy with 100 more ME than you.

A&P is helpful, even vital, for certain types of 91/135 jobs, specifically Bush/Alaska flying.
rickair7777 is offline  
Old 11-18-2010, 01:07 PM   #3  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Twin Wasp's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Oct 2007
Position: Asst. button pusher
Posts: 2,480
Default

I'd say 4 allows them to use flight following experience under 135 or 91K if the FAA thinks it's close to a 121 operation.

I did it before they required the pilots to be 121, only PIC of an aircraft with more than 600HP. When I went to the FSDO for the practical, they asked what quailified me to take the test. I said I was PIC of an aircraft with more than 600 HP. The Fed asked what kind of plane and I said "DC-3." Everyone sort of backed away.

They'll dump a Boeing AFM (they're using 737s now), weather package and charts on the table. You've got two hours to build a flight plan and release. Mine was DFW-LAS. Then you'll spend a couple more hours answering questions about how you got the MaxTO weight you did and how much fuel is used between ABQ and GUP.

Whether it'll set you apart much I don't know. I've been on OpSpecs working in the Cheif Pilot's office to sign releases and part time at 142 that has a Dispatcher program and have taught some classes for them. It's sort of like the Riggers certificate, off in it's own little world.
Twin Wasp is offline  
 
 
 

 
Post Reply
 



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:26 PM.