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Retired 121 to fractional


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Retired 121 to fractional

Old 11-12-2019, 10:54 PM
  #21  
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Default retirement is over-rated

Originally Posted by mooneymite
As one of those guys who went from the top of the 121 pyramid to 91K, it wasn't about money at all. I have plenty. It wasn't about not having interests/activities to fill my day, it is all about the flying.

My background was military and major 121 flying with a few hours of general aviation at the beginning. NetJets provides me a great opportunity to fly and travel on the company dime. Do I work harder than at the airline? Yes! Much harder. Do I make less pay? Yes, much less pay. Do I love my job and look forward to it? Yes.

With all the scheduling and financial pressures gone since the kids are all raised, this is almost pure fun. I fly around an a beautiful jet, stay in (mostly) great places in (mostly) nice hotels with (mostly) great captains for 7 days, then go home and practice retirement for 7 days.

I recognize this is not for everyone, but if you love to fly/travel, feel too young to quit and flying co-pilot doesn'tbother your ego, NetJets is a terrific gig for post-121 pilots.
My sentiments exactly. I've got three years to go in Boeing world, but find myself looking forward to flying business jets in retirement. My situation is probably too good to walk away from until age 65, but I'll admit I don't get enough hand flying and takeoffs and landings doing 12 to 17 hour legs in the 777. I got in this business for the fun of flying, not for the money or to push buttons. To be honest, flying floats or tundra tires in Alaska sounds pretty good right now (but probably not a realistic retirement job). Yes, I can (and will) buy my own airplane and fly for fun, but there is just a limit to how much fun it is to fly without a purpose. MUCH of the joy of this job for me is that it IS a job. I have an important task to perform that requires me to be on my game and produce for my employer. That element gives the flying life meaning and purpose. Boring holes in the sky in a SE airplane just for fun can get old in a hurry.
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:08 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by got2fly
My sentiments exactly. I've got three years to go in Boeing world, but find myself looking forward to flying business jets in retirement. My situation is probably too good to walk away from until age 65, but I'll admit I don't get enough hand flying and takeoffs and landings doing 12 to 17 hour legs in the 777. I got in this business for the fun of flying, not for the money or to push buttons. To be honest, flying floats or tundra tires in Alaska sounds pretty good right now (but probably not a realistic retirement job). Yes, I can (and will) buy my own airplane and fly for fun, but there is just a limit to how much fun it is to fly without a purpose. MUCH of the joy of this job for me is that it IS a job. I have an important task to perform that requires me to be on my game and produce for my employer. That element gives the flying life meaning and purpose. Boring holes in the sky in a SE airplane just for fun can get old in a hurry.
Veterans Airlift Command, Angel Flight, or Pilots for Paws may provide a purpose and a sense of fulfillment that working for shareholders cannot.
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Old 11-13-2019, 04:05 AM
  #23  
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Don’t be surprised if some fractional pilots take silent offense to retired airline pilots and their desire to continue flying after age 65.

For many at fractionals, it is their career. Having a retired person sitting next to you who doesn’t need the money and then gloats about it, can be, well, an unneeded distraction.

In addition, all of us are mortals. I remember from my fractional days there were many retired pilots that were no longer competent in the cockpit yet had no concept of their declining abilities.
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Old 11-13-2019, 04:33 AM
  #24  
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Retired airline pilots create problems for younger pilots because they fill an employment hole and stagnant wages when wages should be rising because of lack of pilot supply.
Most airline pilots i have seen enter the corporate or fractional world are glad to have something else to do with their time and are not Nearly as concerned about the compensation because they have already put in a lifetime career for the money,
Just lose the “this is a great retirement job” mentality....for all our sakes.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:04 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by got2fly
My sentiments exactly. I've got three years to go in Boeing world, but find myself looking forward to flying business jets in retirement. My situation is probably too good to walk away from until age 65, but I'll admit I don't get enough hand flying and takeoffs and landings doing 12 to 17 hour legs in the 777. I got in this business for the fun of flying, not for the money or to push buttons. To be honest, flying floats or tundra tires in Alaska sounds pretty good right now (but probably not a realistic retirement job). Yes, I can (and will) buy my own airplane and fly for fun, but there is just a limit to how much fun it is to fly without a purpose. MUCH of the joy of this job for me is that it IS a job. I have an important task to perform that requires me to be on my game and produce for my employer. That element gives the flying life meaning and purpose. Boring holes in the sky in a SE airplane just for fun can get old in a hurry.
You will have fun lugging bags and furnitures, clean the cabins, wipe down the tables and seats. Oh, don’t forget the toilet too! Lots fun fun fun for you to have.
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:39 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by got2fly
My sentiments exactly. I've got three years to go in Boeing world, but find myself looking forward to flying business jets in retirement. My situation is probably too good to walk away from until age 65, but I'll admit I don't get enough hand flying and takeoffs and landings doing 12 to 17 hour legs in the 777. I got in this business for the fun of flying, not for the money or to push buttons. To be honest, flying floats or tundra tires in Alaska sounds pretty good right now (but probably not a realistic retirement job). Yes, I can (and will) buy my own airplane and fly for fun, but there is just a limit to how much fun it is to fly without a purpose. MUCH of the joy of this job for me is that it IS a job. I have an important task to perform that requires me to be on my game and produce for my employer. That element gives the flying life meaning and purpose. Boring holes in the sky in a SE airplane just for fun can get old in a hurry.
Go rent a 172 if you want to fly. In the airline world flying is probably the most prominent component of the job. At a fractional, actual flying is shadowed by vacuuming carpets, cleaning poop off the toilet, loading and unloading bags, making sure rental cars are in place, ordering fuel from the front desk, restocking snacks, sitting in the pilot lounge for hours on end, “limos” shuffling you to a working airplane nearby because your airplane broke, oh and multiple airlines per work trip to get to and from airplanes.

But if you want a dynamic change to your work environment and that lifestyle appeals to you, you should absolutely go for it.
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:43 AM
  #27  
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What about working as a CFI after airline retirement? I think teaching aspiring pilots to fly would be rewarding. And you can basically decide how much you want to work. A buddy of mine did Seaplane Ratings in his personal 1959 Tri-Pacer, and he did that while still flying for a major airline.

A number of retired pilots found out the fractional lifestyle isn't for them with the occasional 14+ hour days and all the additional duties mentioned above. If I could justify the expense of my own plane I'd love to do the "Pilot's for Paws" thing
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Old 11-13-2019, 09:08 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by AntiPeter
In addition, all of us are mortals. I remember from my fractional days there were many retired pilots that were no longer competent in the cockpit yet had no concept of their declining abilities.

100% spot on! I sent one FO home from Europe on the airlines. He put my flaps up on short final going into Le Bourget. Shortly thereafter the Feds pulled his license after a botched checkride.

NetJets flying is demanding as h€ll. It’s not a retirement gig. I have sympathy for the people back in 04-08 that came because their pension got smoked. But those days are over, and there is no reason for a 65 year old to be slinging the gear on a Phenom 5 legs a day.


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Old 11-13-2019, 09:56 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by flyboy041
You will have fun lugging bags and furnitures, clean the cabins, wipe down the tables and seats. Oh, don’t forget the toilet too! Lots fun fun fun for you to have.
I thought about post-121 retirement bizjet flying. But all those factors weren't attractive so I'm sticking with Sim instructor/Check airman and Maintenance test/Ferry flying.

Even the best of corporate customers can be demanding, but charter/fractional pax can be a real PIA.
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Old 11-13-2019, 11:36 AM
  #30  
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Not to get too much OT, but reading this, I really want to know how in the world the fracs and 135 are going to even be able to find pilots 5 years from now when the 121 retirements are full steam ahead??

I just don’t see how they can when you are doing 3 times the work for half the pay as one does at a major. Heck, even the regionals are much less work for roughly similar pay as NJ.
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