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Stephen Sharp

Old 05-03-2010, 10:29 PM
  #31  
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Default Some Factual Insight

Sorry you are out of your league on this one. Below is a study I was very much part of back in 1998.

TEST STANDARDS AND ACCURACY
The accuracy of drug testing is an area where I've decided to neglect all statistics. Those who oppose drug testing provide numbers indicating a high level of false positives. Those who favor drug testing provide numbers indicating high levels of accuracy. The fact is that accuracy varies widely from lab to lab. Generally speaking, NIDA labs are accurate.
NIDA (The National Institute of Drug Abuse) is the government organization responsible for regulating the drug-testing industry. The vast majority of urine drug screens done these days conform to NIDA specs, and ALL testing associated with the government (department of transportation, etc.) complies with the NIDA standard. It is NIDA that decides what the "safe" cutoffs are to avoid false positives.... Despite what you might hear on the net, urinalysis, if done correctly, is a very accurate scientific procedure. I know of no labs that simply report the results of the initial EMIT screening without confirming the sample on GC/MS. The fact is, labs WANT you to test negative, because then they only have to run an EMIT test on your urine (a few cents). If you test positive, they must then confirm the positive result on GC/MS, which is considerably more expensive. . . . Incidentally, the machine which tests the hair is a relative of the GC/MS, but is FAR more precise. It can accurately detect levels of THC in a solution that are below 1 ng/mL!

CAP (College of American Pathologists) also certifies laboratories the way NIDA does. NIDA keeps it's labs in check by sending positive and negative double-blind samples. Lab personnel does not know what samples came from NIDA. If the lab results are wrong, NIDA may take away the labs certification. Only labs that perform the GC/MS on site can be NIDA certified. Labs that send samples to another laboratory for GC/MS confirmation are ineligible for NIDA certification. "Drug testing when done properly with all required controls and confirmation procedures is very accurate and reliable" (anon1).

Not all labs are NIDA/CAP certified. Some labs do not properly and thoroughly clean the GC/MS equipment. Some labs don't even do a GC/MS confirmation! Some labs use cheap alternative methods to reduce expenses.

Many human errors occur in labs and cause inaccurate results. Some are careless or irresponsible errors, and some errors are accidents. Human error can ruin the results of ANY test, screening or confirmation GC/MS.

The only lab you should be concerned with is the one that is testing you. Only Federal jobs require NIDA standards. Your typical private employer may use any lab s/he chooses, which would very likely be the least expensive. Businesses don't always choose NIDA labs that follow-up a positive screening test with a confirmation GC/MS.

Procedures used: In the workplace, an EMIT screening is typically used, with a CG/MS confirmation if the EMIT is positive. However, this is not a rule; employers can, and some do, use unusual procedures. Some employers use the RIA, and some use the hair test. The government uses RIA. They may or may not supervise the subject. Olympic athletes must be monitored by courier after a competition. The courier stays with the athlete until the athlete urinates, with a time frame of up to sixty minutes.

False positives: No laboratory process is completely free from error. The GC/MS test is virtually error free, but the EMIT is far from accurate. There are some false positives you should avoid if you're getting an EMIT test. Take this seriously; false positives run high. If you know that there will be a GC/MS confirmation test, you can disregard this section. It would be too lengthy to list all of the false positives here. Jeff Nightbyrd's "Conquering the Urine Tests" pamphlet lists a majority of the false positives in detail. (If you are clean, want to get back at the testing industry for conducting these absurd tests, and know that there will be a confirmation test, you could consume several false positives. This would force labs to pay for the high priced GC/MS test, eventually drive up test expenses. You will still pass the test as long as you didn't use any true positives.)

Ibuprofen: Ibuprofen is a common pain reliever that (even in low dosages) used to cause a false THC positive on the EMIT test. The EMIT has been changed to use a different enzyme to eliminate false positives due to Ibuprofen. Ibuprofen in very high doses will still interfere with both the EMIT and the GC/MS. There is some conflicting data here because some sources say that the GC/MS tests can distinguish between Ibuprofen and THC (as well as other over-the-counter drugs).

Cold remedies, pain relievers, hay fever remedies, & diet pills: Decongestants and diet pills result in false positives for amphetamine use in one third of the test samples given to 40 of the countries leading laboratories. There are roughly 300 over-the-counter drugs that cause false positives on the EMIT.

Antibiotics: Certain antibiotics (like Amoxicillin) are claimed to cause a positive for heroin or cocaine. My expert source was unable to verify this, so I regret that there is some uncertainty here.

Melanin (black skin): Melanin is the brown pigment that protects your skin from UV rays. It was raised as a discrimination issue in the 1980's, and argued that melanin's molecular structure is similar to that of a THC metabolite. Subsequent research revealed flaws in the data. Melanin was found to have no effect on THC metabolite testing.

DHEA: DHEA taken by AIDS patients will cause a false positive for anabolic steroid use.

Dental treatment: Caine products (like novacaine) used in dentistry have been known to cause false positives for cocaine.

True positives (legitimate): Some legal products actually contain small amounts of illegal chemicals. All tests, including the GC/MS, will test you positive because the metabolites derived from the true positive are identical to the metabolites of the illegal drugs. One exception: poppy seeds will not cause a positive GC/MS (explained below).

Poppy seeds: Poppy seeds, usually on breads, contain traces of morphine, and lead to positives for opiates. According to Dr. Grow, eating a pastry filled with poppy seeds will bring results showing that you are a *high level* opiate user. Harold Crossley, a nationally known chemical dependency expert, said you would have to eat 100 poppy seed bagels to score a positive on a drug test. When taken into account that very few poppy seeds are sprinkled on bagels, you can see that poppy seeds from a hundred poppy seed bagels will easily fill a single large pastry. Purim cookies, a Jewish food known as Hamantashen, may have five to six tablespoons of poppy seeds. A couple Purim cookies may cause a positive test. Poppy seeds can be distinguished from illicit drugs on the GC/MS test. Although poppy seeds have the same metabolites as opium, these metabolites are shown to have different patterns when viewed with the GC/MS.

Testosterone supplements: Orchic extract (found in bull's balls) will give a positive for anabolic steroid use. It is a legitimate substance that causes the test to imply that you abuse steroids.
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Old 05-03-2010, 10:38 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by unitedpilot View Post

diet pills: Decongestants and diet pills result in false positives for amphetamine use in one third of the test samples given to 40 of the countries leading laboratories. There are roughly 300 over-the-counter drugs that cause false positives on the EMIT.
Stacker 3 and Hydroxycut both cause positives for PCP, first hand experience with that :/

Did the yourintheclear site get taken down btw? All im seeing is a godaddy page
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:57 AM
  #33  
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[quote=unitedpilot;805812]
Originally Posted by DeadHead View Post
Like it or not, it implies a method that will positively influence the results of a federally mandated drug test.
quote]

Unless the website was www.DearAirlinePilotBeatYourFederallyMandatedDrugT est.com then you as I said are uneducated on our privacy laws. I guess our 5th and 6th amendment rights are no good right?? See you don't even know what they are because your prestiguous "Ailrine Pilot" title is what matters. Get off your high horse and down to what is really illegal here to constitute this misdeameanor or felony charge whatever it is. How can someone sell a drug test drink to pilots right????? That is everyone's first response. We don't even know if he sold it to even one pilot do we?

Please spare me your banter. If he was a drug user or actually sold to pilots then this will be revealed. Have you seen his guys web site?? Well I have and I truly think this was purely a selective prosecution and have no idea who this dude is. Chit he probably jump seated with me today and I would probably give him a tighter handshake rather than a shrug on my shoulders.
His airline career is now in the chitter forever basically as well as his reputation if he had any. This whole story smells like chit.

I side with the pilot.

First and foremost, I made no direct connection to this guys' legal woes with his company and the fact that he is an airline pilot. I could care less what this guy's primary career is. It's irrelevant, and to be perfectly honest, I truly don't believe this guy is a drug user and I bet he is a fine individual/pilot.

To be perfectly honest, I am no Harvard Professor when it comes to privacy law, you called me out there successfully. The thing is I haven't intimately studied the legitimacy of privacy, and other such laws, prevalent in the America. The thing is, I'm not a federal prosecutor, the only thing I can imagine in this case is what the company looks like to a federal prosecutor. Like I said earlier, it appears as a method to ensure/manipulate a positive result of a federally mandated drug test. The benign fact that it is an all-natural, herbal remedy that merely cleanses the body doesn't change the fact that it is designed to prevent adverse test results.

Furthermore, if you want to expand on your understanding of privacy laws, then by all means you should run to this guy's side and help him out with his legal fees. If you truly believe his civil rights as an American are being violated, then by all means you should support him. This guy is now spending somewhere upwards of $40,000+ trying to plead his case with nothing to win, but his freedom.

My point here is that there are hundreds of thousands of preppy law school graduates working for the federal government just dissecting anything that may appear to be a prosecutable case. It's costs these individuals nothing to destroy a guy like this because that is there lively-hood, whereas a guy like this is merely trying to make an honest living. Prudent judgment would have dictated to stay away from a product like this as to not motivate those gun-ho federal prosecutors to attack. When it comes to testing the legitimacy of our federal laws against the government, the general public defendant will always be the loser.

I don't have a dog in this fight and I prefer not to take sides because I don't know all the facts, but I wish this guy the best with regards to a positive outcome for him and his family.
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:29 AM
  #34  
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Some advice and relevant info related to drug testing from SPARC (Separated Parenting Access & Resource Center)

Sit down and make a comprehensive list of all prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications and foods that you've taken in the last several months. Many prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications and even foods can cause "false positives" on drug tests. All drugs alter body chemistry; after all, that is why they're taken. Unfortunately, changes in body chemistry can fool some drug tests and produce inaccurate results ("false positives").


1. Poppy seeds, for example, can show up on a drug test as morphine.


2. Cold remedies that contain codeine can also cause a positive result for morphine.


3. Valium reportedly can produce erroneous indications of PCP (Phencyclidine), and other cold remedies can apparently produce false reports of methamphetamine usage.


4. Dextromethorphan can produce a falsely positive qualitative urine opiate screening.


5. The widespread availability of hemp-containing products, including everything from hemp-seed oil nutritional supplements to hemp-seed candy, cookies, cheese, bread, cooking oil, and general seasoning, means that ingesting ANY of these products could potentially cause a false positive result on a test for marijuana.


6. Ibuprofen, contained in Advil, Nuprin, and Mortin, can make a positive result for marijauna. The EMIT test (an immunoassay test) has therefore been changed to use a different enzyme to eliminate false positives due to Ibuprofen. Ibuprofen in very high doses will still interfere with both the EMIT and the GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer) test. Ibuprofen: Ibuprofen is a common pain reliever that (even in low dosages) used to cause a false THC positive on the EMIT test. The EMIT has been changed to use a different enzyme to eliminate false positives due to Ibuprofen. Ibuprofen in very high doses will still interfere with both the EMIT and the GC/MS. There is some conflicting data here because some sources say that the GC/MS tests can distinguish between Ibuprofen and THC (as well as other over-the-counter drugs).


7. Common over the counter cold, asthma, and allergy remedies and diet pills such as Diatec, Dexatrim, Cotylenol, Triaminic, Primatene, Bronkotabs, and Nyquil can show up as positive for amphetamines.


8. Vicks Formula-44, Demerol, Mydol, Primatene-M and common prescription antidepressants such as Elavil and Tofanil can show up as positive for opiates such as opium and heroin.


9. Ephedra, also known as Ephedra Alkaloids or 'MaHuang Extract' has a chemical structure which is closely related to amphetamine, and can reportedly give a false positive for amphetamines. Often sold as an 'energy pill' it is an effective decongestant in low doses.


10. Valerian root is reported to cause false positives for benzodiazepines. Other herbal supplements such as Kava Kava and St Johns Wort may also affect body chemistry such that false positives are produced.

11. Zoloft is reported to cause false positives in urine screens, although for what specific substance isn't clear.

12. Primatene can also show up as positive for barbiturates, and Benadryl can show up positive for Methadone.


13. Some additional over the counter medicines that may cause various kinds of drug test interactions include Alka-Seltzer plus, Allerest, Bronkaid, Contac, Donnagel, Sinuntab, and Sudafed.
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:37 AM
  #35  
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Selling a product designed to avoid a potential false-positive due to the above conditions should not be criminal. Any personal thoughts, feelings or biases to Mr Sharp's motives are really not relevant in a court of law.

An appropriate and marketable name for such a product could certainly play on the word urine since we are talking about a urine screen.
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