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Embraer E170/190 Type Ratings

Old 10-05-2010, 09:53 PM
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Default Embraer E170/190 Type Ratings

I am curious to know how pilots flying both the Embraer E170's and E190's are rated in the United States.

According to document 8900.1, effective 07/21/2010 Pilot Certificate Aircraft Type Designators- Airplane, there are separate type ratings issued issued for both types (EMB-170 and E-190).

http://registry.faa.gov/TypeRatings/

This surprises me, given that the other countries whose pilot licencing systems I am familiar with issue only a type rating for the E170. Their documentation, however, states that the rating is valid for the E170, E175, E190 and E195. It also surprises me given the FAA policy of issueing one type rating to cover the entire Boeing 737, DC-9, and Learjet family, especially given the greater generational differences.

I am curious to know whether I have misunderstood the document and would like to know whether pilots who operate both types of aircraft have both EMB-170 and E-190 printed on their plastic certificate?

Thanks, in advance, for all replies.





Last edited by Panama Jack; 10-05-2010 at 10:11 PM.
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Old 10-06-2010, 07:38 AM
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There two ways to do this...

The CRJ for example is one type rating which applies to all three (four?) types. You can earn the rating on any of the models. In order to conduct 121 ops you need differences training in the versions which you did not originally earn the type on.

The 75/76 on the other hand are documented as two different type ratings. The training would be similar to the CRJ, train on one model with some additional differences to earn the additional rating. Looks like the 170/190 fall into this category too.

I'm not sure why they do it that way, whether it's manufacturer's preference or determined by the FAA. Operationally it's six of one, half-dozen of another.
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Old 10-06-2010, 02:10 PM
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Mine says ERJ-170/190 Company has a differences class.
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Old 10-06-2010, 02:14 PM
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I fly a 170 and 175. My license says E170/190. All I would need to do is take an approved differences course (online at our company) and some IOE and I could fly the 190/195.
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Old 10-06-2010, 06:31 PM
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The 757 and 767 have a common type, you take your ride in one and your certificate will say B757 B767. There are a handfull of two for one types, DC-6 DC-7, VC-700 VC-800 and one three for one. The Feds seem to go back and forth on whether ratings should be common. The Super DC-3 is a separate rating. OK, so the tailwheel comes up and the cowl flaps are electric and it has less rudder. In the late 40s that was enough to require a different type.
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Old 10-06-2010, 08:49 PM
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Flying Illini, your response is particularly interesting. Are you saying that when you did your Checkride on the E170 or E175, you were issue with a certificate that said "EMB-170 and EMB-190"?

Interesting also, Twin Wasp, on the FAA's approach to the 757/767 type qualification.

That would explain a lot.
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Old 10-06-2010, 09:05 PM
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While we're at it, I've been in a "straight" Cj sim and flown the Cj2 and Cj3. Now, having been in the Cj4, I want to know how one type covers them all. The difference between a "straight" Cj and a Cj4 is like the difference between a (insert piston single) and a (insert bizjet).

Don't get me wrong, I'm incredibly happy about it...but it makes one curious as to where and how they decide to draw the line.

There seems to be no logic behind it. So, you takes whats youz can gits.

-mini
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Old 10-07-2010, 02:22 AM
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Mini,

About the same way one could legally go from an early 70s CE500 to a 2009 Encore+.

In fact, there's probably more variance between the CE500 types than the CE525 types.
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Old 10-07-2010, 05:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Panama Jack View Post
Flying Illini, your response is particularly interesting. Are you saying that when you did your Checkride on the E170 or E175, you were issue with a certificate that said "EMB-170 and EMB-190"?

Interesting also, Twin Wasp, on the FAA's approach to the 757/767 type qualification.

That would explain a lot.
That's exactly right. I took my checkride in an E170 configured sim and received a certificate that states ERJ-170; ERJ-190.
It's a common type rating between the two a/c.
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Old 10-07-2010, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Panama Jack View Post
I am curious to know how pilots flying both the Embraer E170's and E190's are rated in the United States.

According to document 8900.1, effective 07/21/2010 Pilot Certificate Aircraft Type Designators- Airplane, there are separate type ratings issued issued for both types (EMB-170 and E-190).

http://registry.faa.gov/TypeRatings/

This surprises me, given that the other countries whose pilot licencing systems I am familiar with issue only a type rating for the E170. Their documentation, however, states that the rating is valid for the E170, E175, E190 and E195. It also surprises me given the FAA policy of issueing one type rating to cover the entire Boeing 737, DC-9, and Learjet family, especially given the greater generational differences.

I am curious to know whether I have misunderstood the document and would like to know whether pilots who operate both types of aircraft have both EMB-170 and E-190 printed on their plastic certificate?

Thanks, in advance, for all replies.



Guys,

You're confusing aircraft type ratings (pilot) with aircraft type certificates (aircraft). The 757 and 767 are separate type certificates but a similar type rating.
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