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Foreign pilots

Old 02-02-2022, 06:41 AM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by rickair7777
They would be aware of it. The government does not usually take unilateral actions without coordinating with or informing industry and labor stakeholders.
Which is good to know. As mentioned I have no idea why those rumours came up and since nobody has failed or been succesful (I know at least one guy who filed I140 a few weeks ago) to obtain official answers or results there's no useful hints besides some greedy attorneys.
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Old 08-24-2023, 01:48 AM
  #52  
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Default Avoid the EB2-NIW

After attempting the EB2-NIW I feel I need to warn everyone out there.

The blood sucking lawyers out there saw an opportunity to cash in and boy-oh-boy did they ! This visa category is not really applicable to pilots, if you are ďjustĒ a line pilot, maybe if you wrote a new training manual or developed a new training system or something else exceptional you might qualify.

Even after meeting the criteria for the exceptional ability part, there is almost no way of meeting the National Importance or Beneficial to the US to waive a job offer Dhanasar prongs. Just citing a pilot shortage is not enough, as many (including the USCIS) believe there isnít one.

In my case, and many other colleagues I have spoken to, the reply from the USCIS was that just being a pilot going to fly for 1 airline is not of national importance or beneficial to the US, which makes sense, 1 pilot is not going to make any difference in the great scheme of things.

Some pilots did get their applications approved, I personally know a few, but I know many many more who didnít. Maybe the case officer had a great day, who knows. In short it is a very subjective process, it all depends on the case officer, you have the same chance of success applying for the Diversity Visa Lottery.

If you are going to attempt the application at least do yourself a favour and go with a ďcheapĒ lawyer, thereís a company out there charging $5000 up front, and only if youíre petition is successful will you pay the remaining amount. The firm I went with ( which I will regret to my dying day ) charged upwards of $12000 up front and the service I received was terrible and after almost 5 months the petition they filed was no better than the $5000 law firm, in fact I could have downloaded a template and done a better job over a weekend. AG

Donít believe any lawyer, they will tell you anything to get your retainer, always with the caveat (softly whispered) that they off course cannot guarantee success.

I didnít do enough research, fell for the lawyers sales pitch and lost a ridiculous amount of money.. In the immortal words of Forest Gump : Stupid is as stupid does.
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Old 12-05-2023, 10:52 AM
  #53  
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I am enquiring about the generic recruitment process with regards to my situation.

For context, I am a British Army Military Pilot currently residing in the US on an Exchange posting with the US Army flying the AH-64 Apache. I will have the right to live and work in USA as my wife is a US Citizen and Iíll have a green card post my military career.
My long-term goal over the next 3 years here, is to build up my Total Time to 1500hrs. I currently have 800hrs total including Rotary and Fixed Wing time. Previously, back in the UK, I gained my CAA PPL (Single Engine Piston) and I have already started the process to gain my FAA PPL.

I am looking to complete my IR, CSEL and ME add on, as well as build up my PIC hours, whilst flying Apaches and Fixed Wing in my spare time. I will also be looking to get my Military Competency Commercial Certificate Rotary with Instrument Rating as well.

My questions are:
- Would someone in my position who has had a slightly different route to getting the ATP minimums be looked at differently during the hiring process?
- Would I be seen as awkward to hire? Or would I be seen like anyone else who had made the ATP minimums?
- Do airlines stray away from hiring foreign nationals even though they have the right to work in the US?
- Are there any initial observations that would make recruiters wary of hiring some one just based off of what you have read?
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Old 12-05-2023, 01:13 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by richardsonn100
I am enquiring about the generic recruitment process with regards to my situation.

For context, I am a British Army Military Pilot currently residing in the US on an Exchange posting with the US Army flying the AH-64 Apache. I will have the right to live and work in USA as my wife is a US Citizen and Iíll have a green card post my military career.
My long-term goal over the next 3 years here, is to build up my Total Time to 1500hrs. I currently have 800hrs total including Rotary and Fixed Wing time. Previously, back in the UK, I gained my CAA PPL (Single Engine Piston) and I have already started the process to gain my FAA PPL.

I am looking to complete my IR, CSEL and ME add on, as well as build up my PIC hours, whilst flying Apaches and Fixed Wing in my spare time. I will also be looking to get my Military Competency Commercial Certificate Rotary with Instrument Rating as well.

My questions are:
- Would someone in my position who has had a slightly different route to getting the ATP minimums be looked at differently during the hiring process?
- Would I be seen as awkward to hire? Or would I be seen like anyone else who had made the ATP minimums?
- Do airlines stray away from hiring foreign nationals even though they have the right to work in the US?
- Are there any initial observations that would make recruiters wary of hiring some one just based off of what you have read?
Going in order: I had a non standard military to airline route, being a Navy helicopter guy who had civilian Airplane time but not much Navy until a late career swap to a turboprop (E-2) but stil not enough to get hired, but I got out in 2011. So not a great time. I flew King Airs for years, went to Delta with about 5500 fixed wing time. But now? Get to ATP mins ASAP.

Awkward? No. Helcopters aren't as discriminated against in as in the old (pre "shortage") days, provided you have Multi Engine time.

3 of my last 4 F/Os have been foreign born with US Permanent Residency. Polish, Italian and Scottish. Right to work is the big thing. Get the green card ASAP.

You sound like a fairly standard helo to airlines guy. Just with a funny accent and weird definition of biscuit.
Theres a bunch of groups geared towards getting Army guys to the Airlines. RTAG amongst others.
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Old 12-05-2023, 08:18 PM
  #55  
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As CX500T said, you'll be fine.

Nothing special or different at all related to being foreign or green card. UK isn't very foreign by our lights anyway.

You'll have a leg up based on the military background. If you don't have a college degree that may be a factor (essentially all US mil pilots do), but it's not required any more and I think the mil background will supersede that anyhow.

Just focus on getting your flight credentials competitive for your end goal, the rest is non-issue.
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Old 12-06-2023, 11:24 PM
  #56  
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Hey all,

Me and my wife will be visiting her family in California in January, we're looking at starting the spousal green card process on our return to England. I'm a 737 captain here with about 5k-ish hours on the 737, around 2500 PIC. I don't quite fully understand how the US airline T's and C's and lifestyle compare to the UK. I can see pay is better and some of the major differences are clear but there are a lot more variables such as cost of living/commute that don't exist in the UK market. I'd be interested in attending a roadshow or event where I can learn more about the lifestyle and ask questions. Is there anything going on in January?

Alternatively, if anyone has jumped from UK airline -> US airline I'd be very interested in a chat.
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Old 12-07-2023, 04:50 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by richardsonn100
I am enquiring about the generic recruitment process with regards to my situation.

For context, I am a British Army Military Pilot currently residing in the US on an Exchange posting with the US Army flying the AH-64 Apache. I will have the right to live and work in USA as my wife is a US Citizen and Iíll have a green card post my military career.
My long-term goal over the next 3 years here, is to build up my Total Time to 1500hrs. I currently have 800hrs total including Rotary and Fixed Wing time. Previously, back in the UK, I gained my CAA PPL (Single Engine Piston) and I have already started the process to gain my FAA PPL.

I am looking to complete my IR, CSEL and ME add on, as well as build up my PIC hours, whilst flying Apaches and Fixed Wing in my spare time. I will also be looking to get my Military Competency Commercial Certificate Rotary with Instrument Rating as well.

My questions are:
- Would someone in my position who has had a slightly different route to getting the ATP minimums be looked at differently during the hiring process?
- Would I be seen as awkward to hire? Or would I be seen like anyone else who had made the ATP minimums?
- Do airlines stray away from hiring foreign nationals even though they have the right to work in the US?
- Are there any initial observations that would make recruiters wary of hiring some one just based off of what you have read?
You'll be fine. The most awkward thing for you will probably be being confused for an Aussie. You probably won't be able to get an R-ATP but you may qualify for some airline RTP programs. As long as you put the time in you'll find that most places will be willing to hire you as long as meet their competative hiring minimums and don't have a bad personality.
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Old 12-10-2023, 02:18 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by richardsonn100
I am enquiring about the generic recruitment process with regards to my situation.
Contact -

https://www.rtag.org/
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Old 12-10-2023, 04:10 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by BlueHarper
Hey all,

Me and my wife will be visiting her family in California in January, we're looking at starting the spousal green card process on our return to England. I'm a 737 captain here with about 5k-ish hours on the 737, around 2500 PIC. I don't quite fully understand how the US airline T's and C's and lifestyle compare to the UK. I can see pay is better and some of the major differences are clear but there are a lot more variables such as cost of living/commute that don't exist in the UK market. I'd be interested in attending a roadshow or event where I can learn more about the lifestyle and ask questions. Is there anything going on in January?

Alternatively, if anyone has jumped from UK airline -> US airline I'd be very interested in a chat.
Obviously need FAA licenses. U.S. airlines require ATP minimums and ATP written to get hired.

Airlines call 1000 hrs 'highly competitive.' With 5,000+ hrs TT you're what they're looking for. With 2,500 hrs TPIC on a 737 you're REALLY what they're looking for.

In 2014 the major airlines had approx. 17,000 applicants and 1/3 (5,000) were 'highly competitive.'. The industry was hiring less than 5,000 pilots that year. IE they could require 1,000 hrs TPIC if they wanted. Now? August 2022 data 5,900 applicants, 1,500 'competitive' (500 hrs TPIC), 750 'highly competitive' whie hiring 8,000 pilots. So only 10% are 'highly competitive relative to their hiring demand.

You can bid any base, and seat, that your seniority can hold. Base to base transfers, if they are openings, can occur every month. New/different aircraft? Most airlines have a 2 year training lock-in. I had a 37 yr career - 10 type ratings, 17 type rating schools, 30 (?) bid status/base changes. Winter 777 pilot? Bid DFW and fly to Hawaii for the winter. Spring time bid back.

Commuting is a choice. YOU make that choice. Want to live in Colorado for an airline that doesn't have a Denver base? About 50% of our pilots commuted. But living in base is **MUCH** easier. You and your wife make that decision. You can jumpseat or you airline (priority vs other airline pilots - OAL pilots) or try commuting on other airline's. If no space in back you're eligible to jumpseat in the cockpit but now you're the OAL that goes behind the airline's own pilots.
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Old 02-10-2024, 12:25 PM
  #60  
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Angry Do NOT use AG Immigration for EB-2 NIW Visas

Fellow Pilots,

This is a heads up for anyone considering to use an immigration law firm to apply for an EB-2 NIW visa in the US, NOT to use AG Immigration. I'm an airline pilot and made the mistake of choosing them, leading to more than 8 months of hell. Their founder and top attorney, along with their best lawyers and many other employees, left the firm as it is very shady. I lost my entire team working on my file, including my assigned lawyer. I was never notified of this and left in the dark for months. I only found out after calling them. Their web site and sales pitch state that they are experts in immigration and located across the United States. This is not true. Most of their staff are in Brazil. They use inexperienced people with limited English to complete key government forms. Even after multiple attempts and corrections they were filled with outrageous mistakes. They were so careless they even pasted the bullet points from my resume into the forms, freezing them. They are not following USCIS guidelines to complete them. It's so bad it's almost a guaranteed refusal. If anyone is stuck with this firm, read-up carefully the instructions for forms such as the I-140 and ETA-9089 and then verify them carefully before signing. Safer yet, get your money back! Word is from someone who works there they're facing going out of business. Employees and clients are leaving, including me without filing. I've been told for nearly a month that I will be refunded, it's been nothing but lies. Communications is practically non-existent. A rare time they reached out to me was in Portuguese from someone in South America. I doubt I'll see my $15,000 USD again. If I can save others from this same fate, that would have been a good thing.

As for the EB-2 NIW, after this experience, I'd recommend to anyone interested in it to research doing it yourself. There are some great resources on YouTube on how to self-file. If you pick a firm, please research them carefully. I've never been scammed before, this is a terrible experience. Ultimately, it's my fault for having picked this fraudulent firm. Please be careful with these cash grabs. Happy flying!
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