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Airline Pilots with their A&P

Old 02-12-2020, 02:42 AM
  #11  
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I’d think it would be more to work on one’s own plane. Who’d want the potential liability issues with a part time gig.
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Old 02-12-2020, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by sourdough44 View Post
I’d think it would be more to work on one’s own plane. Who’d want the potential liability issues with a part time gig.
I actually am talking about working on one’s own aircraft. If an individual owns an airplane and returns it to service, he/she can be held liable for that work performed. Basically your insurance would insure the aircraft and pay out on the accident, but would not cover you, as an individual for maintenance malpractice long after you sell the aircraft, or even if someone else borrows the aircraft while you still own said aircraft.

While maintenance “malpractice” might sound like an individual committed something egregious, a shyster lawyer could easily convince a jury that something as simple as a Service Bulletin not being performed (which isn’t required under Part 91 ops) is malpractice. Unfortunately, GA is littered with many stories such as someone mentioned above, that a lawyer sued everyone in a logbook to get something for a family (and himself!).

All that I’m asking is go into this with your eyes open, and if you’re ok with it, then great!

With all that said, I work on my own aircraft, and will continue to do so, but I don’t let anyone borrow it, and I’m picky about passengers, as well.
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Old 02-16-2020, 10:25 AM
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If you build your own aircraft, you allowed to work on it.
EAA has info about this a 51% kit qualifies you to maintain it.
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Old 02-20-2020, 10:19 AM
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Anymore, an A&P is bad joojoo for anyone with a positive net worth or even a decent stream of income. Pilots seem to think that an A&P provides for some level of knowledge and ability, it simply does not! It has become nothing more a rubber stamp to legitimize felons and third world immigrants working on airliners. A wealthy pilot should understand that he can do anything he wants to his own aircraft. The IA certifies everything at annual. A pro pilot signing a maintenance log is the most financially dangerous thing I can think of outside of selling naked options.

Last edited by kevbo; 02-20-2020 at 10:44 AM.
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Old 02-21-2020, 06:37 AM
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Default Airline Pilots with their A&P

Here is the quick and dirty.

1. School of Missionary Aviation in Ionia, MI is 12-mos long, only break for a four holidays. Class is Mon-Fri 0700-1530. ALL absences must be made up. They are a well renowned Christian organization but for AMT training you DO NOT have to go into missionary work. $25k total in four installments (VA and USDoE approved).

2. Light Sport
a. Experimental Light Sport Aircraft (ELSA)
i. Anyone can perform work on the aircraft. The annual condition inspection must be performed by at least an A&P or Light Sport Repairman (with or without the Maintenance rating).
b. Special Light Sport Aircraft (SLSA)
i. Factory built
ii. Modifications to this aircraft are restricted by the manufacturer.
iii. Only at least an A&P or a Light Sport Repairman WITH Maintenance rating can perform the annual.
iv. A SLSA can be converted to ELSA via paperwork and inspection by a specialist.

Now the “Light Sport Repairman certificate” is attainable via a 16-hour course (I am actually in Louisville KY this weekend for this class). It will be valid for any ELSA that I own (after applying to the FAA).
The Light Sport Repairman Maintenance Rating (LSRM) class is 120-hours over like 15 days. The LSRM will allow you to perform any work and inspections on any SLSA or ELSA that were not prior certified aircraft (think Taylorcraft, Ercoupe,etc that meet the LSA definition). LSRM can charge a fee for their work. LSRM are allowed to apply for FAA approval to take the A&P exams after 30 mos of documented work.

SO... as an active duty professional pilot your best option is LSRM. Build a plane. Perform annual condition inspections. After a few years go to your FSDO and apply to take the A&P!
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Old 02-21-2020, 01:17 PM
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I need to amend my comment; only the Builder or current OWNER of an ELSA that has the Light Sport 16-hr training or A&P or LSRM can perform the annual inspection. If I learn any peachy details I’ll update this.
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Old 02-22-2020, 01:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Chipjumper View Post
I need to amend my comment; only the Builder or current OWNER of an ELSA that has the Light Sport 16-hr training or A&P or LSRM can perform the annual inspection. If I learn any peachy details I’ll update this.
Anyone who can afford an ELSA need only 16 hours of training. Po folks need 1900 plus $24k. Everyone knows you can get it for free if you are close to the right people. How can anyone be qualified to work on everything with such limited training and experience? There is clearly a different standard for millionaires who want the certificate and people who need to make a living with it.

Last edited by kevbo; 02-22-2020 at 01:41 AM.
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Old 02-22-2020, 03:22 AM
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The ELSA I’m picking up on Monday is $15.1k. I’m certainly not a “millionaire”. You’d be surprised how many blue collars own aircraft.
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Old 01-31-2021, 10:20 AM
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I fly for United and just got my A&P a year ago. It's doable. The biggest hurdle is getting the approval on the Form 8610-2 that documents your experience. You must have that 8610-2 in order to take the three written tests (General, Airframe, and Powerplant). Once you have someone from the FSDO agree with all your experience, as documented on the 8610-2, and they sign it, it is good forever. Just don't lose it. My Inspector told me he kept a file for them and that if I did lose it, he could generate a new copy for me....but still....just don't lose it.

Once you pass your first exam, you have 24 calendar months in which to get all three complete and complete your Oral & Practical.

I highly recommend using Baker's School of Aeronautics (just outside of Nashville, in Lebanon) for the Oral & Practical preparation. They are great at it. They have two options, the one week course and the two week course. The two week course covers written exam prep and testing in the first week, then Oral & Practical prep in the second week, with the O&P scheduled with one of the local DMEs at the end of that week. If you go with the one week course, you must show up with all three of your written exams already completed so you can roll right into the second half of the course.

I've actually been really busy during the covid times with 100-hr inspections, resurrecting two airplanes that hadn't flown in years (a Swift and a Navion), installed shoulder harnesses in my best friend's C-170, among other things. It's great to have your A&P if you own an airplane or just love to tinker.

Sam Swift
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Old 01-31-2021, 12:31 PM
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The Aviatrix
She's not an airline pilot, but has a couple of planes that would many envious.
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