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Old 03-06-2006, 10:06 AM   #1  
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Default lost logbook

had the unfortunate incident of having a friend throw out my logbook yesterday.. i can track thru the flight schools and FBO's that i rented from for a lot of the time and look at my 8710's, but there are still 25 hours that i have in total time that i cannot afford to take the hit on as i get ready for my comms stuff... these 25 hours are planes that i tried to purchase and logged the time for when i demod the aircraft.. how do i put this back into my logbook?
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Old 03-06-2006, 10:19 AM   #2  
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Just the subject of this thread sent chills down my back. I won't ask how someone "threw away" your logbook, thats too bad.

Fortunately I found this response to a similar question on the internet that may help you, I'll post it here:

There are several things you can do to reconstruct logbooks. I have copied the section from the Inspectors Handbook to assist you. This is a piece of cake. If you need futher assistance contact your local FSDO.

Aeronautical training and experience that is used by airmen to meet the requirements for a certificate or rating, or for recent flight experience, must be documented in a reliable record. This section provides guidance to operations inspectors on the requirement for airmen possession of logbook records and replacement of pilot flight experience records.

A pilot logbook is the primary evidence of pilot experience; however, inspectors may accept operator records in lieu of a personal pilot logbook.

731. LOST LOGBOOKS OR FLIGHT RECORDS.
Inspectors should advise airmen that they may reconstruct lost logbooks or flight records by providing a signed statement of previous flight time.

A. Proof of Experience. Airmen may use the following items to substantiate flight time and experience:
Aircraft logbooks
Receipts for aircraft rentals
Operator records
Copies of airman medical files
Copies of FAA Form 8710-1, "Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application"

B. Obtaining File Copies. Airmen who have lost their logbooks or flight records may request copies of their files from the FAA by writing to the following:
FAA Airmen Certification Branch, AVN-46
P. O. Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125

FAA, Aeromedical Certification Branch
P. O. Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125

NOTE
Inspectors should encourage pilots to complete the flight time sections of official record forms, even though it would not be required for that specific certificate. These records document a chronological development of flight time in case personal records become lost.

Reference material is FAA Order 8700.1 Volume 2, Chapter 9, Section 731

____________________________
hope this helps man, best of luck
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Old 03-06-2006, 12:00 PM   #3  
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UConn, it could be a lot worse...

Most guys who lose their books do it after they have 1000-2000 hours. Airlines really prefer to see original loogbooks w/ endorsements... ESCPECIALLY the first one. Some airlines require original paper logbooks. You'll still have everything but PVT/IFR.

I zeroxed my first logbook (with the endorsements) and keep it in a fireproof safe. You can also double-bag it and keep it in the freezer which will also work as a fire-proof box.

As for the airplanes you demo-ed, the dates and exact times are not super important, but you will need the actual tail numbers...if you make up tail numbers you could be screwed because those are in the FAA registration database (accessible online by anyone) and employers may randomly check some of your logbook entries.

In the past, some less-honest pilots would log "time" in airplanes (usually twins) that they saw sitting on the ramp. But today the interviewer might pull up the registration, and then you'd have to explain why you were flying a plane registered to the DEA or some celebrity...yes this has happened.
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Old 03-06-2006, 06:48 PM   #4  
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enter your hours into an excel doc as you go.

if you're comp savvy you can do all the sigma thing that adds it all up nicely, or you can go and buy one of those 40 buck ones that are really cool
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Old 03-06-2006, 09:13 PM   #5  
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I have mine duplicated on my computer. When this current(and first) log fills up it will probably go in a safe deposit box at the bank. Point being that if the house burns down, it's not here.
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Old 03-07-2006, 07:24 AM   #6  
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When you get your logbook all set again, take a photo copy of everypage when it is full.
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Old 03-07-2006, 10:19 AM   #7  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aspiring_pilot
enter your hours into an excel doc as you go.

if you're comp savvy you can do all the sigma thing that adds it all up nicely, or you can go and buy one of those 40 buck ones that are really cool
This is my advice exactly. Works real well!
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Old 03-09-2006, 11:01 AM   #8  
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i jsut found a couple copied pages from my original logbook that i had stowed away... the aircraft that i demo'd from other people have since been sold.. how am i supposed to tell a DE or interviewer who owns the aircraft if i dont have that information anymore.. for example.. Mike Smith sells Piper arrow xyz to Bill Jones... when someone googles the N-number, Bill Jones will come and they think its a bust... am i better off forgetting about the 10 or so hours?
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Old 03-09-2006, 01:34 PM   #9  
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If you actually flew the airplane and know the N-number and date, feel free to log the time. If anyone asks, tell the truth: the dealer owned it at the time.
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Old 03-13-2006, 06:22 PM   #10  
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Lost my first logbook when my car was stolen. Went to the FAA and got a copy of my previous 8710s. I then took these 8710s to show proof and included a document in my next logbook that said that the flight time forwarded into the new book was correct and legal with a signature. The FAA took this to be good enough for me when i took a 135 check ride. The big thing was the signature sheet that stated that the time was correct to the best of my knowledge. Hope this helps. Since then I keep all my time in excel as a backup.
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