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Old 07-29-2012, 05:53 AM   #11  
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See my post in the "Open Letter" thread. Too much of time time we thing aviation=airline pilot. This is why there is no shortage of pilots and why it's a "buyers market" for the airlines as far as pilots. There are so many ways to be in aviation and experience it, and we shoot ourselves in the foot when we limit it to one thing. Being a pilot is awesome, there's nothing like it. That doesn't mean I have to be an airline pilot, or transport pilot, or military pilot, or any one of these specialties. Being a pilot is a general thing.
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Old 07-29-2012, 08:13 AM   #12  
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thanks you guys i have learned alot. if you can think of anything else i would appreciate it.

So if we were to make a list of important things to do in the next few years:

-Dont plan on major in aviation unless its aerospace engineering, have a back up in something else
-stay in the CAP program and try to find out if they AFROTC at his HS
-doing it through the military or reserve is a good way to do it if ends up being what he wants to do.
-have him work on his private pilots license. Im hoping the the CAP program can get us some contacts on this.

I like the CAP program, its seems to be a pretty good deal. He has only been involved for a couple months so far. Have all of you that have been involved in this program feel it was time well spent?

Thanks
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:09 PM   #13  
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Originally Posted by utroyalwulff View Post
Hello everyone, firstly Im not a pilot and know relatively little about planes but I have a 13 year son that loves planes and aviation. He flies remote control planes and is now going to race pylon racers and messes with the flight simulator that I bought for him on the home computer trying to learn to put flight plans together and how to navigate between airports.

He is a very smart kid. I tell him that if he likes planes maybe he should be a pilot. He signed up with the local civil air patrol group last week. He went to his grandparents house that live by the airforce academy but it had been evacuated because of fires because he is interested in that, so maybe next year. I dont have alot of money so probably the government is going to help him learn how, which according to my friend that is a surgeon is exactly the right thing to do.

The university where I work has a flight training school, but I dont really know that much about it.

Since i guess most of you are pilots what do you think I should tell him? Should I push him towards another profession?

I like that he likes it because he is learning so much. but what does the future appear to look like?
www.thetruthabouttheprofession.weebly.com

Saves me a lot of typing
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:14 PM   #14  
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Originally Posted by JamesNoBrakes View Post
See my post in the "Open Letter" thread. Too much of time time we thing aviation=airline pilot. This is why there is no shortage of pilots and why it's a "buyers market" for the airlines as far as pilots. There are so many ways to be in aviation and experience it, and we shoot ourselves in the foot when we limit it to one thing. Being a pilot is awesome, there's nothing like it. That doesn't mean I have to be an airline pilot, or transport pilot, or military pilot, or any one of these specialties. Being a pilot is a general thing.

+10! JNB you hit it right on the money.

A guy can fly for fun and during a lifetime can explore many different aspects: soaring, aerobatics, taildraggers, racing, floats, fixed wing, rotary wing, etc. And a guy can fly for a living and explore many different aspects: military, passenger, cargo, dusting, floats, wheels, bush, guiding, instructing, corporate, fractionals, ferrying, surveying, patroling, etc. There are lots and lots of ways to scratch the flying itch. There are folks who find tremendous satisfaction in all of these areas, and some even make a very good living at it. But what's right for one person isn't necessarily right for another, so you want your child to know that aviation has myriad aspects.

Whatever you do, don't PUSH (your term) your child toward aviation. The passion needs to come from within.
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:25 PM   #15  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utroyalwulff View Post
thanks you guys i have learned alot. if you can think of anything else i would appreciate it.

So if we were to make a list of important things to do in the next few years:

-Dont plan on major in aviation unless its aerospace engineering, have a back up in something else
-stay in the CAP program and try to find out if they AFROTC at his HS
-doing it through the military or reserve is a good way to do it if ends up being what he wants to do.
-have him work on his private pilots license. Im hoping the the CAP program can get us some contacts on this.

I like the CAP program, its seems to be a pretty good deal. He has only been involved for a couple months so far. Have all of you that have been involved in this program feel it was time well spent?

Thanks
I was a CAP cadet and now my daughter is. It can be a great and worthwhile experience or a complete waste of time depending on the local squadron. It's like the boy scouts; its only as good as the local volunteers running it. It is also what you put into it. Take advantage of the orientation flights (all 10), glider camps, powered camps, cheap flight training, etc.

Also check out the young eagle program from the EAA. They give free rides for kids. It's just another way to get up in the air.

I offered to teach any CAP cadet to fly for free IF they pass the written and the medical. None took me up on it.
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:31 PM   #16  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utroyalwulff View Post
thanks you guys i have learned alot. if you can think of anything else i would appreciate it.

So if we were to make a list of important things to do in the next few years:

-Dont plan on major in aviation unless its aerospace engineering, have a back up in something else
-stay in the CAP program and try to find out if they AFROTC at his HS
-doing it through the military or reserve is a good way to do it if ends up being what he wants to do.
-have him work on his private pilots license. Im hoping the the CAP program can get us some contacts on this.

I like the CAP program, its seems to be a pretty good deal. He has only been involved for a couple months so far. Have all of you that have been involved in this program feel it was time well spent?

Thanks
You should make a few more posts so you can send and receive private messages.

Maybe I missed it, have you taken any flying lessons yourself? Have you seen the TV program "Flying Cheap" or Chesley Sullenberger's testimony before Congress on the state of the profession? If not, I think that all can be found on youtube.

Definitely not all bad in the industry either. Maybe you read my rants in the "Open Letter" thread below. I'm frustrated that the truth about the profession (see what I did there?) is often NOT forthcoming-especially from the flight schools looking to make a sale!
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Old 07-29-2012, 03:38 PM   #17  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utroyalwulff View Post
Hello everyone, firstly Im not a pilot and know relatively little about planes but I have a 13 year son that loves planes and aviation. He flies remote control planes and is now going to race pylon racers and messes with the flight simulator that I bought for him on the home computer trying to learn to put flight plans together and how to navigate between airports.

He is a very smart kid. I tell him that if he likes planes maybe he should be a pilot. He signed up with the local civil air patrol group last week. He went to his grandparents house that live by the airforce academy but it had been evacuated because of fires because he is interested in that, so maybe next year. I dont have alot of money so probably the government is going to help him learn how, which according to my friend that is a surgeon is exactly the right thing to do.

The university where I work has a flight training school, but I dont really know that much about it.

Since i guess most of you are pilots what do you think I should tell him? Should I push him towards another profession?

I like that he likes it because he is learning so much. but what does the future appear to look like?
If you'd like to chat offline (via phone), I'd be happy to talk. Send me an email at my screenname @ hotmail.com.

I did the degree track (UND), paid for school in the national guard, flight instructed, flew at a regional airline, and now fly corporate for a fortune 50 company. I've also been heavily involved in the Civil Air Patrol at many different levels.

Josh
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Old 07-29-2012, 06:53 PM   #18  
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It is pure fun recreation, with the advantage that if he decides aviation is for him, he'll already have a leg up on the process, and if not, he'll have a great off-work pastime.....
And all the glider flight time counts toward the 1500 hour total time requirement for an ATP certificate.
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Old 07-29-2012, 08:00 PM   #19  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utroyalwulff View Post
-Dont plan on major in aviation unless its aerospace engineering, have a back up in something else

-have him work on his private pilots license.

These are the two most important things. Number one is the major. I can't stress this enough... get a degree in something outside of aviation (unless aerospace engineering).

Glider flying is the best way to get an early handle on good stick and rudder skills (basic flying skills). You can fly gliders at an earlier age than airplanes. Get your son to your local glider club and get him started, he'll develop a great set of flying fundamentals, learn a lot about aviation and when it comes time to do his private pilot's license, it'll take him less time (think less money) because he already knows the basics.
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:13 AM   #20  
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Originally Posted by 727gm View Post
While you must be 16 to solo an airplane, and 17 to license, you only need to be 14 to solo a glider, and 16 for pilot certificate...can add airplane later. A great way to get into aviation and learn to "fly a wing" without the distraction of that noisy fire hazard bolted to the aircraft(engine).
see:
Soaring Society of America, the source for Gliding in the USA

click on "where to fly" to find out if there is a soaring operation
near you.

It is pure fun recreation, with the advantage that if he decides aviation is for him, he'll already have a leg up on the process, and if not, he'll have a great off-work pastime.....
+1

YES! Thank you. $200/hour for a G100 C172 and instructor, based out of a controlled airport with a stretched out touch and go pattern is an expensive way to earn a first solo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diver Driver View Post

Glider flying is the best way to get an early handle on good stick and rudder skills (basic flying skills). You can fly gliders at an earlier age than airplanes. Get your son to your local glider club and get him started, he'll develop a great set of flying fundamentals, learn a lot about aviation and when it comes time to do his private pilot's license, it'll take him less time (think less money) because he already knows the basics.
Spot on.

Last edited by propfails2FX; 07-30-2012 at 12:39 AM.
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