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Old 10-22-2015, 06:40 AM   #11  
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Originally Posted by bozobigtop View Post
All FedEx caravans with hubs in LAS, SAN, ONT, OAK, and SMF. Many of the pilots holding routes from those hubs live in the outstation cities. If you're reserve you may travel to any of these cities either hub or outstation. Most of the routes are Monday afternoon thru Saturday mornings. Early morning flights from the hubs to the outstations in which you're at the outstation doing the day and spend the nights in the hubs. The last pay structure I saw was about 40000 a year to start, but I believe with a route the per diem would make the yearly pay more. They had all the standard benefits better than the benefits I had at the regionals. It's an excellent company with good people.

I hope this information helps you.
Interviewed with West Air a while back. Thought I'd share my experience if anyone is going for an interview. West Air, Inc. Air Cargo Delivery Provider Since 1988

The interview process is a 3 part process that takes about 1.5 to 2 hours: Interview, 25 question written test, and sim ride. It takes place at their Fresno office located at KFAT.

The interview is with the chief pilot and director of ops. It's very laid back and really more of a get to know you. Perhaps they tailor it to your experience. You might just end up 'talking shop' and any stories you have like emergencies, how you saved the day, "there I was a FL350..." Don't sweat the interview at all. They make you feel at home very quickly.

The 25 question written covers 91/135 regs and some AIM. There are 2 questions at the asking for the Garmin 530/430. They don't expect you to know those, but it's a bonus if you can impress them. You'll learn the Garmin ops at Flight Safety. The written is fill-in, not multiple choice. Write as much as you can. You end up 'discussing' the written afterward and any questions you might have. Basically, they didn't grade it for pass or fail. They just want to see that you have a solid foundation of regs and IFR operations since you will be single pilot IFR.

The sim ride utilizes Microsoft Flight Sim with a full yoke setup. The aircraft is the C208. They will tell you approximate power settings and airspeeds. The trim is funky. It's IMC the entire flight. The chief pilot or director will act as ATC. Depart KFAT, vectors for the VOR 11L approach. Fly to MAP, go published missed, and hold. I was asked some random IFR questions during the flight like EFC definition, lost comms procedures, etc. After 1 or 2 turns in the hold, vectors for the ILS. Reach DH, breakout and land. 20-25 minutes total.

Ask for a tour of their maintenance facility. Depending on mx status, you should be able to sit in one of the C208s. Fantastic panel configuration. Full Garmin setup- G600, Gmx200, and G530/430. Google those. Basically full glass. This is a sweet setup for single pilot IFR.

As for the QoL, pay, schedule, the above poster's info is pretty much current.

Training: At least 1 full day in Fresno filling out employment paperwork and going over company ops. Then you're sent home with a Computer Based Training (CBT) course (20 to 30 hours?) to prep you for ground school and flight sim. Roughly 10 days training at Cessna Flight Safety in Wichita. Following by at least 1 week of OE with a check airman to get you up to speed on your route(s), followed by a 135 line check. Full pay does not kick in until you pass your linecheck. You will get approximately half pay from day 1 up to the line check. The CP/DO says pay works out to be roughly 44-45k the first year with annual raises.

Your work schedule starts on a Monday afternoon usually at the outstation back to the hub. Then it's 2 legs per day- early morning from hub to outstation... "rest" during the day, then fly back in the late afternoon. This usually ends on Saturday morning. Some people choose to live at the outstation so they can spend their day (resting) at home instead of a hotel. But then you will need to get a crashpad at the hub. Either way, you're home every day.

They mentioned plans to go into pax operations using the B1900 or Brasilia. WA could be a good place for those wanting to get out of instructing and log turbine PIC IFR. Plus you're home every day so it's an ideal job for those with a family/kids. Cheers!
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Old 10-22-2015, 08:30 AM   #12  
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Originally Posted by Kingfisher View Post
Interviewed with West Air a while back. Thought I'd share my experience if anyone is going for an interview. West Air, Inc. Air Cargo Delivery Provider Since 1988

The interview process is a 3 part process that takes about 1.5 to 2 hours: Interview, 25 question written test, and sim ride. It takes place at their Fresno office located at KFAT.

The interview is with the chief pilot and director of ops. It's very laid back and really more of a get to know you. Perhaps they tailor it to your experience. You might just end up 'talking shop' and any stories you have like emergencies, how you saved the day, "there I was a FL350..." Don't sweat the interview at all. They make you feel at home very quickly.

The 25 question written covers 91/135 regs and some AIM. There are 2 questions at the asking for the Garmin 530/430. They don't expect you to know those, but it's a bonus if you can impress them. You'll learn the Garmin ops at Flight Safety. The written is fill-in, not multiple choice. Write as much as you can. You end up 'discussing' the written afterward and any questions you might have. Basically, they didn't grade it for pass or fail. They just want to see that you have a solid foundation of regs and IFR operations since you will be single pilot IFR.

The sim ride utilizes Microsoft Flight Sim with a full yoke setup. The aircraft is the C208. They will tell you approximate power settings and airspeeds. The trim is funky. It's IMC the entire flight. The chief pilot or director will act as ATC. Depart KFAT, vectors for the VOR 11L approach. Fly to MAP, go published missed, and hold. I was asked some random IFR questions during the flight like EFC definition, lost comms procedures, etc. After 1 or 2 turns in the hold, vectors for the ILS. Reach DH, breakout and land. 20-25 minutes total.

Ask for a tour of their maintenance facility. Depending on mx status, you should be able to sit in one of the C208s. Fantastic panel configuration. Full Garmin setup- G600, Gmx200, and G530/430. Google those. Basically full glass. This is a sweet setup for single pilot IFR.

As for the QoL, pay, schedule, the above poster's info is pretty much current.

Training: At least 1 full day in Fresno filling out employment paperwork and going over company ops. Then you're sent home with a Computer Based Training (CBT) course (20 to 30 hours?) to prep you for ground school and flight sim. Roughly 10 days training at Cessna Flight Safety in Wichita. Following by at least 1 week of OE with a check airman to get you up to speed on your route(s), followed by a 135 line check. Full pay does not kick in until you pass your linecheck. You will get approximately half pay from day 1 up to the line check. The CP/DO says pay works out to be roughly 44-45k the first year with annual raises.

Your work schedule starts on a Monday afternoon usually at the outstation back to the hub. Then it's 2 legs per day- early morning from hub to outstation... "rest" during the day, then fly back in the late afternoon. This usually ends on Saturday morning. Some people choose to live at the outstation so they can spend their day (resting) at home instead of a hotel. But then you will need to get a crashpad at the hub. Either way, you're home every day.

They mentioned plans to go into pax operations using the B1900 or Brasilia. WA could be a good place for those wanting to get out of instructing and log turbine PIC IFR. Plus you're home every day so it's an ideal job for those with a family/kids. Cheers!
That's all fine and dandy but PIC time in Caravan doesn't get you squat. I know from experience. If you have the time go to the regionals and get multi turbine time. PIC time requirement is now a thing of the past...
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Old 10-22-2015, 10:17 AM   #13  
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That's all fine and dandy but PIC time in Caravan doesn't get you squat. I know from experience. If you have the time go to the regionals and get multi turbine time. PIC time requirement is now a thing of the past...
If the legacy/major carriers are the end goal, then sure, 1000+ Caravan PIC is nothing more than a resume filler to their hiring boards. But if staying 135 and flying PC-12s is a goal, then this would be an ideal gig. If being home every day is important, then this is an ideal gig. Heck, even retired airline pilots looking for a little extra $ and want to keep flying (and not commute to a crashpad), this is an ideal gig. So yes, for those aspiring for the legacy/major carriers, it's probably best to go the regional airline route. To each their own.
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Old 10-22-2015, 12:09 PM   #14  
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If the legacy/major carriers are the end goal, then sure, 1000+ Caravan PIC is nothing more than a resume filler to their hiring boards. But if staying 135 and flying PC-12s is a goal, then this would be an ideal gig. If being home every day is important, then this is an ideal gig. Heck, even retired airline pilots looking for a little extra $ and want to keep flying (and not commute to a crashpad), this is an ideal gig. So yes, for those aspiring for the legacy/major carriers, it's probably best to go the regional airline route. To each their own.
Not true... I flew 121, now flying a cushy 91 jet gig. You know what that caravan time did for me? Nada. Do you know what helped me land this job? Jet time.

I suppose if someone only aspires to fly a PC-12 fine, but why limit yourself?
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Old 03-28-2020, 07:25 AM   #15  
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Does anyone have updates on west air?
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Old 01-26-2021, 07:09 PM   #16  
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Does anyone have updates on west air?
Was just passing by but now I'm curious about the same thing
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Old 04-07-2021, 02:52 AM   #17  
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Was just passing by but now I'm curious about the same thing
Ditto................................
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