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Republic - Three RAH subsidiaries, one list.

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Republic - Three RAH subsidiaries, one list.

Old 01-11-2010, 09:07 PM
  #1  
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Default Republic - Three RAH subsidiaries, one list.

Can anyone give me the history of how the subsidiarys of Republic were joined under one seniority list. Specifically - I see that you are teamsters. Was that brought about through the action of Teamsters?

Thanks
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Old 01-12-2010, 03:15 AM
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no....i believe it came about after the OLD shuttle America was purchased ......
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Old 01-12-2010, 05:20 AM
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Stop dreaming about republic and get a life.
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Old 01-12-2010, 06:23 AM
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Here is the history of the three current certificates operating under one list...

In the early 2000's, there was only Chautauqua. Bedford tried to create an alter ego carrier (think go-jets) that would operate on a different certificate with non-union or non-teamsters pilots, whichever worked. To prevent this, the Teamsters actually grew a pair and fought off the start up of Republic Airlines. Alter-ego Republic never did happen. In the 2003 CHQ pilot CBA, scope language was included that absolutely forbid anything other than a single seniority list for pilots flying a RAH aircraft, no matter what certificate or airline the flying was done by. If RAH owned more than 50% of a company/airline, those pilots must be part of a single master seniority list.

In late 2004, E-170's were added to the CHQ certificate, alongside the E135/140/145 family. At this point CHQ was still a single certificate, single list group. These planes were flown for united with 70 seats installed. However, the contract Chautauqua had with American did not allow CHQ to operate a plane with more than 50 seats FOR ANY CARRIER, not just American. A financial penalty was assessed monthly against CHQ. To avoid this penalty, Bedford set about to start up Republic Airlines again, this time as a haven to protect his company from the fines assessed by American. Bedford tried to do it on the cheap, and it bit him in the butt. The Republic certificate was constantly delayed, and no relief was acheived.

In May, 2005, the fines owed to American for operating the E-170 went up considerably, and Bedford was really in a rush to get those United 170's off of the CHQ certificate. With the Republic certificate growing moldy on the FSDO's desk and no immediate hope of having that certificate operational, Bedford made a deal to acquire Shuttle America. At the time, a company called Wexford Capital held and financed both carriers, and they pulled the strings to make the acquisition happen. Shuttle America was flying Saabs for United at the time, which Colgan picked up. Bedford dumped the United 170's onto the Shuttle certificate, and the majority of the Chautauqua 170 pilots began to transition over to the Shuttle certificate. The pilots leaving CHQ were already on the CHQ master seniority list, so no problems arose there. The Saab pilots were required to be merged into the master seniority list. That merger went to arbitration, but it was completed. During those months of negotiation and arbitration, some Saab pilots ended up on temporary furlough. However, they all had seats at the completion of the integration, and the arbitrator's award was honored despite the various misgivings many of us had.

Also during the summer of 2005, Republic AIrways Holdings (RAH) was created as a holding entity for Shuttle America and Chautauqua. RAH found itself in a position to buy the fleet of 28 E-170's off of USAirways' MidAtlantic brand. Those planes had 72 seats, and could not be added to the CHQ certificate because of American's 50 seat restriction, and could not be added to Shuttle because at the time United had a similar restriction of 70 seats that applied to any aircraft on the Shuttle certificate, not just ones flown for United. The Republic Airlines certificate finally got off the ground in September of 2005. The US Airways 170s were placed on the Republic certificate, which had zero limitations on aircraft size or capacity. CHQ pilots from the master seniority list transitioned over the Republic certificate, and the single master list was maintained during the growth from 1 to 3 certificates. US Airways furloughed pilots were accomodated onto our seniority list through Jets for Jobs, and eventually most left, but some stayed and are pleased with their decision.

From 2005 through 2009, we have operated with three certificates and one seniority list. Our 2003 contract did not really address the concept of multiple operating certificates, other than keeping all pilots on one list. We have had our share of heartburn over the multiple certificates, and it is planned that our next CBA will address many of theses issues. Time will tell.

In 2009, it was announced that RAH would acquire Frontier, Lynx, and Midwest. The CHQ CBA that covers all RAH pilots required that all those pilots be integrated into the master seniority list. Also in play were the Mokulele caravan pilots, but RAH divested itself of Mokulele before integration was achieved. Currently, the integration process is at work. It is scheduled to conclude by the end of May, 2010. Just as in the CHQ/Shuttle merger, Midwest, Frontier, and Lynx pilots will have access to current RAH aircraft once the seniority integration is complete. Until that time, they are effectively assigned to their premerger aircraft. While that has had no effect on the jobs of Frontier and Lynx pilots, it has left Midwest pilots jobless. However, precedent has already been set, and all the new additions to the RAH pilot group must be treated equally. RAH, Midwest, and Frontier all have furloughs, and those furloughs are just as stuck to their pre-merger flying as every other group has been. It just so happens that Midwest has no pre-merger aircraft. Recalls will affect the certificates unevenly until the integration is complete in May. Again, while it looks unfair from the perspective of a Midwest pilot, the overall application of equal treatment is the only fair course of action.

In 2005, the pilot list was barely 1000 strong. By the end of 2010, the list will include about 3000 pilots. Through all of this growth, the principle of scope has been upheld. Some other attacks on our scope have occured, and are currently being prosecuted. Some will bash RAH for their treatment of acquired pilot groups, but the treatment of other pilot groups has been consistent and legally sound over the years. Circumstance is what makes some feel slighted. Our scope has been applied in every case, and we have applied it consistently. We can only apply it to the actual business presented to us by the company, not to ethical or moral what-ifs.

I hope this history answered your questions. I try to know as much as I can, but things have been in constant turmoil since 2005 here. I am sure I missed some details, and I tried to leave out past back-stories that don't really contribute to answering your question. Claims regarding Midwest were made only because there is so much current mis-information going around and I feel it appropriate to defend out equal application of integration conduct. We don't benefit from singling out one pilot group, and there has been no claims of wrong doing from Lynx or Frontier pilots. The big point is one seniority list has been upheld, and we take our list very seriously. As it stands now, the Midwest certificate is gone, and the Lynx and Frontier certificates will be added to the pot, bringing our total up to five operating certificates with just one seniority list.
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Old 01-12-2010, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by carlomonte View Post
Stop dreaming about republic and get a life.
How about you let the guy ask a question and go get a life of your own. These message boards are far better when you come here to learn something and not just yell at random people for no reason.
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Old 01-12-2010, 07:50 AM
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Thanks for the history RightSeat. It helps and good luck to us all.
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Old 01-12-2010, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by carlomonte View Post
Stop dreaming about republic and get a life.
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Old 01-12-2010, 08:05 AM
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So the question is....what is a fair merger of the lists? Sounds like this will all go to arbitration. Everybody wants to be on the top, and everybody wants lynx stapled to the bottom (which i dont see how that is fair).
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Old 01-12-2010, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by carlomonte View Post
Stop dreaming about republic and get a life.
The man asked a simple question no need to jump down his throat.



Thanks RSB for typing out the very lengthy and informative history.
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Old 01-12-2010, 08:30 AM
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The RAH pilots should certainly be congratulated over the scope success.

But here's something to keep in mind for future contracts...

AA and UA pilots negotiated the limitation on RJ size which applies not only to their brand of feed but to any OTHER flying done by their regionals. Why did they apply it to flying outside of their brand? Presumably to help slow the industry-wide shift of flying from mainline to the regionals. They expended negotiating capital to help protect other pilot groups.

Us regional pilots should think twice when our companies come up with schemes to circumvent other people's scope.
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