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Old 03-08-2018, 10:09 AM   #1  
Gets Weekends Off
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Apr 2010
Posts: 143
Default Managing Training Risk/Thriving in ZW NH trng

Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you handle it.

Iím going to present an alternative thesis that will contrast with others that have been presented. I make no claim that my thesis is more correct than any of the others, and I will caveat up front that my zero experience in Pt121 ops probably dilutes my credibility, but Iíll share and let you decide.

First off, what is Training Risk? Iíd imagine that most anyone meeting eligibility requirements and then applying to a Part 121 carrier probably knows already, but just to put it on the dry erase board, in no particular order:
- Overall experience
- Turbine experience
- Multi-engine, and/or multi-turbine experience
- IFR experience / IFR proficiency
- High density traffic area IFR experience
- High altitude experience
- CRM environment experience
- Age
- Recency of flight experience
- Experience with/Ability to use contemporary tools: Computer based training, EFB, glass, automation
- Physical fitness*

Itís your responsibility to take a look at the above list, or your own subjective measures, and determine your Training Risk (TR). Havenít flown in a while? TR goes up a little. No turbine time, ok, not a show stopper, but there will be some risk there. Are you handy with an iPad or other EFB platform? That will be a source of ease or frustration in training depending on your skill and proclivities: TR up or down depending.

But here is the important part: Is it the companyís responsibility to assess and manage your training risk? No. And I think this is a source of contention, at least here on these boards. This is an unprecedented hiring market throughout Aviation, as we might all agree. All companies are paying close attention to their recruiting, training costs, and retention, and seeking efficiencies and/or opportunities within those lines of effort. Some companies have ďopened the spigotĒ at the recruiting and hiring points, allowing applicants on property to enter training if they meet qualifications, at a rate and qualitative cross section that hasnít been seen in 40 years. So now you have to ask yourself: would I rather the company cinch down on their hiring and lower their training risk (at my opportunity loss), or would I rather have the opportunity to give it a go and manage my own training risk? I think one thread starter hit the nail on the head: buyer beware. You get what you ask for. However, itís my contention that the training hurdle is surmountable, if you are prepared and ready for the task.

I say that itís not the companyís responsibility to manage your training risk, however: thatís not to say that the company isnít fully aware of the training risk level walking in the door, and paying attention to the costs vs. the training success rate (ROI). No-one in their right mind would hire folks just to go through a month in the classroom and not make it through sims. Salary, benefits, hotels, positive space travel, instructor time, $im co$t$; they are paying attention. Training footprints are becoming more flexible, as output requirements dictate giving those who just need a little more adjustment what they need to succeed.

Ok, so what does this all mean to the price of tea in China? Simply put, if you find yourself at the higher end of the risk spectrum, that does not mean that you will not/cannot complete the training. Two keys to success will help:
First, understand that Higher Risk = More Effort Required throughout the training program. Are you a CFI that went from zero to Applicant in the Part 61 world? Guess what: you will probably not spend much time in the Appleton bars. Are you 60 years old and never owned and iPad? Buy one off of Craigslist, and screw around with it until it becomes second nature.
The Second Key to Success: Attitude!!! When you are stuck, or at a low point in training, take a moment, take a deep breath, and thank your instructor, because they are there specifically for you, and then ones that Iíve met take pride in their work and whether or not you succeed. Think about it: if you are prone to getting frustrated, micro facial expressions, or fits of anxiety, itís going to have an effect those within your sphereótons of books out there about it. Practice managing your comportment in a professional way. Guaranteed, at some point youíll struggle: youíll be in the sim, youíll get a missed out of a single engine approach, forget your callouts, miss your obstacle clearance turnÖ The worst thing that you could possibly do in that moment is wag a finger at your instructor or otherwise confront them with your struggle. You wanted to be here: act like it.

Finally, for those viewers that are still with us: at least at Air Wisconsin, they thoroughly brief the class on day one of Indoc on what is expected, and what the recipe is to succeed in training. Thereís no secret, no surprises, no special sauce needed. Some highlights:
- Sleep. Think itís worth it to cram an hour or two more? Donít: go to sleep and be rested/alert in class.
- Pay attention in class. Sounds like a no-brainer, but worth mentioning. Active listening is key, not just watching the clock.
- Do the homework. I made it a point to not only answer the questions, but I paid particular attention to where I was finding the answers in order to get better at finding information within the various pubs, not just collaborate and write down the answers my classmates had.
- Study with your classmates. Study session starts at 5:30? Be there on time.
- Sidebar: if you have previous 121 experience and/or the material is coming easy, donít be THAT dooshcanoe and skip study sessions. Thereís someone in your class that could use the help, and youíre not doing anything better in your ATW hotel room; you can spare the time.
- Diet/fitness. Donít load down on a big lunch that will put you to sleep in the afternoon.
- Whatever you do to unwind for an hour per day, make time for that; doubly so on the weekendsóunplug, relax, decompress. The gym is crap in the ATW hotel, but I was down there every morning, some days just for 10 min on the treadmill to get the blood flowing; my thing, you do yours.
- Before you get to CPT/Sims, you have to memorize things. Memorize them. Simple enough. I resorted to second-grade rote memorization: I wrote things out over and over again like Bart Simpson on the chalkboard. No joke. Itís not rocket surgery.

*Physical fitness doesnít mean the ability to run a half marathon. Do you get sleepy in the afternoon? Will you be alert and learning an hour after lunch in Systems class? Can you manage your circadian rhythm to make that 4am sim slot on the east coast when you commuted in from Mountain Standard Time?
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Old 03-08-2018, 11:39 AM   #2  
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I used to view the forum just looking for informations as a guest, i specifically signed up just to replay to your thread and say thank you for your amazing words and guidance in helping other pilots to succeed, good job.
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Old 03-08-2018, 03:17 PM   #3  
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+1

Well said.
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Old 03-08-2018, 03:40 PM   #4  
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Brilliant post - and applicable to any job in any industry. It all distills down to how badly do you want it and how willing are you to ensure you get it [knowing your strengths and weaknesses]. Well said.
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Old 03-19-2018, 03:25 AM   #5  
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Joined APC: Apr 2010
Posts: 143
Default Fortune favors the bold (and prepared)

I read a suggestion somewhere on these boards that to get ready for AirWis training one should become “an expert on visual approaches”. Not sure what that means…300/nm so at 4 miles I should be at 1200’ ATZE. Pitch/power settings, small corrections based on frequent crosschecks. Simple enough—this is not a passive sport, but it’s also based mostly on third grade level math and fine motor skills. Don’t overthink it.

Alternatively, I’ll offer up the following prep advice. Confidence, mental agility, ground game.

Confidence. Obviously, don’t skip step 1 up above, risk assessment. Honesty starts with being honest with yourself, brutally honest. But take the good with the bad: if you’ve assessed your risk and are confident, then be confident. Evel Knievel at the rim of the Snake River Canyon confident. Confidence means if you stumble, you can take credit for the mistake and right yourself with a positive attitude. If you spent some time as a CFI or in a crew environment, consider who you preferred as a student or crew member to work with. Was it the one who showed up with pre-loaded excuses and self flagellation with every error, or the ever-positive workhorse who expressed gratitude for constructive feedback? Confidence is contagious and also a force multiplier.

Mental agility. I recommend assessing what you’ve been doing for the past several years, and how that will compare to the working environment of the cockpit. With all of the other distractions, while maintaining a crosscheck, callouts, ATC comms, can you quickly compute and crosscheck your altitude at 3.5nm from the runway on a visual? Rolling terrain—s#!t…gotta compute off of ATZE not RadAlt in this case. Brain hurt? Do some mental agility prep. Luminosity, etc. Foot stomp iPad familiarity here: if you’ve never had one, I recommend getting one and working with settings, installing and working with apps, switching between apps while working on a task, search functions, etc.

Ground game: two parts, flashcards and active listening. I’m a big flashcard fan. If you prefer flashcards or some other method, my advice is to start on Day 1. I procrastinated generating my full stack of flashcards until the second week of sims preparing for my oral. Big mistake. Keep in mind, you’ll use (and continue to add to) this stack beyond IOE. My suggestion is that after you’re done with your homework the first night of INDOC, take the homework questions and load them up into your flashcards. I use gFlashPro, but theres several versions out there. I’d be wary of using a pre-built stack; for one, you could obviously be introducing some accuracy errors with a stack someone else built, and two, you building your own stack is yet another mental repetition that will help cement the learning.
Active listening. Don’t take my word for it: research it for yourself. I didn’t take notes in class. Fvc#in crazy, huh? I've found that if I'm focused on taking notes, I'm not listening as well, and missing some of the content. Didn’t get this idea on my own: Malcolm Gladwell talks about one of the foremost trial attorneys in the country, David Boies. Mr Boies is dyslexic, reads an average of one book a year, and took no notes in law school. He developed a strategy to counter his dyslexia, by listening intently to his professor, better remembering everything said in class. I brought this concept to ATW, and built my classroom strategy around it. Started with waking up in plenty of time to hit the gym, managed my breakfast and lunch to not weigh me down mentally, took every break as an opportunity to give my brain a 5 min rest with a walk to the water fountain, and pulled focus on the instructor for each class period. Sprinkle in some mindfulness exercises each day for good measure.

Last edited by BFMthisA10; 03-19-2018 at 03:39 AM. Reason: spelling is hard
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Old 03-19-2018, 07:09 AM   #6  
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Joined APC: Nov 2016
Posts: 3
Default iPad Size

Thank you for the training pearls. What size iPad is issued by the company? I am not an iPad guy so I would like to buy a used one for FAM purposes. I start training in May.
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Old 03-19-2018, 07:37 AM   #7  
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Joined APC: Apr 2010
Posts: 143
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobraplt View Post
Thank you for the training pearls. What size iPad is issued by the company? I am not an iPad guy so I would like to buy a used one for FAM purposes. I start training in May.
RumInt says we're due for an upgrade, but the current model is a mini.
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Old 01-27-2019, 04:01 PM   #8  
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Joined APC: Apr 2017
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BFMthisA10 View Post
I read a suggestion somewhere on these boards that to get ready for AirWis training one should become ďan expert on visual approachesĒ. Not sure what that meansÖ300/nm so at 4 miles I should be at 1200í ATZE. Pitch/power settings, small corrections based on frequent crosschecks. Simple enoughóthis is not a passive sport, but itís also based mostly on third grade level math and fine motor skills. Donít overthink it.

Alternatively, Iíll offer up the following prep advice. Confidence, mental agility, ground game.

Confidence. Obviously, donít skip step 1 up above, risk assessment. Honesty starts with being honest with yourself, brutally honest. But take the good with the bad: if youíve assessed your risk and are confident, then be confident. Evel Knievel at the rim of the Snake River Canyon confident. Confidence means if you stumble, you can take credit for the mistake and right yourself with a positive attitude. If you spent some time as a CFI or in a crew environment, consider who you preferred as a student or crew member to work with. Was it the one who showed up with pre-loaded excuses and self flagellation with every error, or the ever-positive workhorse who expressed gratitude for constructive feedback? Confidence is contagious and also a force multiplier.

Mental agility. I recommend assessing what youíve been doing for the past several years, and how that will compare to the working environment of the cockpit. With all of the other distractions, while maintaining a crosscheck, callouts, ATC comms, can you quickly compute and crosscheck your altitude at 3.5nm from the runway on a visual? Rolling terrainós#!tÖgotta compute off of ATZE not RadAlt in this case. Brain hurt? Do some mental agility prep. Luminosity, etc. Foot stomp iPad familiarity here: if youíve never had one, I recommend getting one and working with settings, installing and working with apps, switching between apps while working on a task, search functions, etc.

Ground game: two parts, flashcards and active listening. Iím a big flashcard fan. If you prefer flashcards or some other method, my advice is to start on Day 1. I procrastinated generating my full stack of flashcards until the second week of sims preparing for my oral. Big mistake. Keep in mind, youíll use (and continue to add to) this stack beyond IOE. My suggestion is that after youíre done with your homework the first night of INDOC, take the homework questions and load them up into your flashcards. I use gFlashPro, but theres several versions out there. Iíd be wary of using a pre-built stack; for one, you could obviously be introducing some accuracy errors with a stack someone else built, and two, you building your own stack is yet another mental repetition that will help cement the learning.
Active listening. Donít take my word for it: research it for yourself. I didnít take notes in class. Fvc#in crazy, huh? I've found that if I'm focused on taking notes, I'm not listening as well, and missing some of the content. Didnít get this idea on my own: Malcolm Gladwell talks about one of the foremost trial attorneys in the country, David Boies. Mr Boies is dyslexic, reads an average of one book a year, and took no notes in law school. He developed a strategy to counter his dyslexia, by listening intently to his professor, better remembering everything said in class. I brought this concept to ATW, and built my classroom strategy around it. Started with waking up in plenty of time to hit the gym, managed my breakfast and lunch to not weigh me down mentally, took every break as an opportunity to give my brain a 5 min rest with a walk to the water fountain, and pulled focus on the instructor for each class period. Sprinkle in some mindfulness exercises each day for good measure.
Great posts! Appreciate others willing to share their wisdom, very helpful perspective.
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Old 01-27-2019, 07:25 PM   #9  
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Joined APC: Mar 2018
Posts: 8
Default Don't go to Air Wis w/out previous jet time

Current Air wis pilots list the failure rate as 50%.
For older pilots returning to flying, 100%.

Why go there, to waste time if you don't fit their mold?
Experienced jet pilots only, if you want training to be a non issue.

One FO I know there had only 3 of 11 get retained by the company.
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Old 01-27-2019, 08:01 PM   #10  
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Joined APC: Mar 2018
Posts: 8
Default Managing training / training department

I reposted the OP's post, with edits. I would avoid this place, unless you have previous, recent jet time, and good glass experience.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BFMthisA10 View Post
Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you handle it.

Iím going to present an alternative thesis that will contrast with others that have been presented. I make no claim that my thesis is more correct than any of the others, and I will caveat up front that my zero experience in Pt121 ops probably dilutes my credibility, but Iíll share and let you decide.

First off, what is Training Risk? Iíd imagine that most anyone meeting eligibility requirements and then applying to a Part 121 carrier probably knows already, but just to put it on the dry erase board, in no particular order:
- Overall experience - ( need jet time for Air Wis.)
- Turbine experience - ( need jet time for Air Wis.)
- Multi-engine, and/or multi-turbine experience ( need jet time for Air Wis.)
- IFR experience / IFR proficiency ( need jet time for Air Wis.)
- High density traffic area IFR experience - (need that also.)
- High altitude experience - (Air Wis 20 minutes of training on this by power point; not enough.)
- CRM environment experience ( Air Wis CRM - LCA knows everything; don't speak.)
- Age ( DON"T go here over age 32; you can' keep up.)
- Recency of flight experience ( Don't go here if not very current ! )
- Experience with/Ability to use contemporary tools: Computer based training, EFB, glass, automation ( No glass; don't go here ! )
- Physical fitness* ( Doesn't matter; see above)

Itís your responsibility to take a look at the above list, or your own subjective measures, and determine your Training Risk (TR). Havenít flown in a while? TR goes up a little. No turbine time, ok, not a show stopper, but there will be some risk there. Are you handy with an iPad or other EFB platform? That will be a source of ease or frustration in training depending on your skill and proclivities: TR up or down depending.

But here is the important part: Is it the companyís responsibility to assess and manage your training risk? No. And I think this is a source of contention, at least here on these boards. This is an unprecedented hiring market throughout Aviation, as we might all agree. All companies are paying close attention to their recruiting, training costs, and retention, and seeking efficiencies and/or opportunities within those lines of effort. Some companies have ďopened the spigotĒ at the recruiting and hiring points, allowing applicants on property to enter training if they meet qualifications, at a rate and qualitative cross section that hasnít been seen in 40 years. So now you have to ask yourself: would I rather the company cinch down on their hiring and lower their training risk (at my opportunity loss), or would I rather have the opportunity to give it a go and manage my own training risk? I think one thread starter hit the nail on the head: buyer beware. You get what you ask for. However, itís my contention that the training hurdle is surmountable, if you are prepared and ready for the task.

I say that itís not the companyís responsibility to manage your training risk, however: thatís not to say that the company isnít fully aware of the training risk level walking in the door, and paying attention to the costs vs. the training success rate (ROI). No-one in their right mind would hire folks just to go through a month in the classroom and not make it through sims. Salary, benefits, hotels, positive space travel, instructor time, $im co$t$; they are paying attention. Training footprints are becoming more flexible, as output requirements dictate giving those who just need a little more adjustment what they need to succeed.

Ok, so what does this all mean to the price of tea in China? Simply put, if you find yourself at the higher end of the risk spectrum, that does not mean that you will not/cannot complete the training. Two keys to success will help:
First, understand that Higher Risk = More Effort Required throughout the training program. Are you a CFI that went from zero to Applicant in the Part 61 world? Guess what: you will probably not spend much time in the Appleton bars. Are you 60 years old and never owned and iPad? Buy one off of Craigslist, and screw around with it until it becomes second nature.
The Second Key to Success: Attitude!!! When you are stuck, or at a low point in training, take a moment, take a deep breath, and thank your instructor, because they are there specifically for you, and then ones that Iíve met take pride in their work and whether or not you succeed. Think about it: if you are prone to getting frustrated, micro facial expressions, or fits of anxiety, itís going to have an effect those within your sphereótons of books out there about it. Practice managing your comportment in a professional way. Guaranteed, at some point youíll struggle: youíll be in the sim, youíll get a missed out of a single engine approach, forget your callouts, miss your obstacle clearance turnÖ The worst thing that you could possibly do in that moment is wag a finger at your instructor or otherwise confront them with your struggle. You wanted to be here: act like it.

Finally, for those viewers that are still with us: at least at Air Wisconsin, they thoroughly brief the class on day one of Indoc on what is expected, and what the recipe is to succeed in training. Thereís no secret, no surprises, no special sauce needed. Some highlights:
- Sleep. Think itís worth it to cram an hour or two more? Donít: go to sleep and be rested/alert in class.
- Pay attention in class. Sounds like a no-brainer, but worth mentioning. Active listening is key, not just watching the clock.
- Do the homework. I made it a point to not only answer the questions, but I paid particular attention to where I was finding the answers in order to get better at finding information within the various pubs, not just collaborate and write down the answers my classmates had.
- Study with your classmates. Study session starts at 5:30? Be there on time.
- Sidebar: if you have previous 121 experience and/or the material is coming easy, donít be THAT dooshcanoe and skip study sessions. Thereís someone in your class that could use the help, and youíre not doing anything better in your ATW hotel room; you can spare the time.
- Diet/fitness. Donít load down on a big lunch that will put you to sleep in the afternoon.
- Whatever you do to unwind for an hour per day, make time for that; doubly so on the weekendsóunplug, relax, decompress. The gym is crap in the ATW hotel, but I was down there every morning, some days just for 10 min on the treadmill to get the blood flowing; my thing, you do yours.
- Before you get to CPT/Sims, you have to memorize things. Memorize them. Simple enough. I resorted to second-grade rote memorization: I wrote things out over and over again like Bart Simpson on the chalkboard. No joke. Itís not rocket surgery.

*Physical fitness doesnít mean the ability to run a half marathon. Do you get sleepy in the afternoon? Will you be alert and learning an hour after lunch in Systems class? Can you manage your circadian rhythm to make that 4am sim slot on the east coast when you commuted in from Mountain Standard Time?
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