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PA16 08-06-2020 06:46 AM

The expect further clearance was EOD after FEB 2021?

MrAirplane 08-06-2020 07:32 AM


Originally Posted by PA16 (Post 3105827)
The expect further clearance was EOD after FEB 2021?

We were told as soon as they have class dates to assign. They aren't sure when they will get those dates.

PA16 08-06-2020 09:52 AM

Thanks

.
.

efc4life 08-08-2020 05:19 PM


Originally Posted by MrAirplane (Post 3105382)
I was a "straight civilian" and interviewed in OKC 2 weeks ago. Currently waiting for a class date for the academy.

Civilian as well. I'm doing my medical and PFT1 this week.

Rich5857 08-12-2020 05:40 AM

UAS at Sierra Vista and San Angelo
 
I was recently referred and given the option for San Angelo or Sierra Vista as a fixed wing only guy. Is there anyone currently working at one of these locations that can give me the day to day? Is it UAS only?

Benjibelt 08-12-2020 02:50 PM


Originally Posted by Diverb (Post 3109140)
I left Sierra Vista in December, and for a fixed wing only guy, it will be UAS only. Sierra Vista does have one AS350 now, but there are 4-5 heavy rotor time guys that fly it 1-2 days a week plus the UAS. If your fixed wing only, you will be in the box operating the UAS daily and you MIGHT see the Cessna 206 once a month for 2-3hrs, but the UAS is the mission and the priority, the 206 is kinda seen as just joy riding since its non mission capable and used for currency.


do you know why the require 1500 and to do a flight check if they are just going to put you on a UAS?

USMCFLYR 08-12-2020 03:42 PM


Originally Posted by Benjibelt (Post 3109202)
do you know why the require 1500 and to do a flight check if they are just going to put you on a UAS?

Because you could be moved into an aircraft at some point?

PA16 08-13-2020 06:21 AM


Originally Posted by Benjibelt (Post 3109202)
do you know why the require 1500 and to do a flight check if they are just going to put you on a UAS?


Originally Posted by USMCFLYR (Post 3109221)
Because you could be moved into an aircraft at some point?

This brings up a question.. I was going to reply to the why to they want 1500 hours and a checkride.. my answer was you are flying a turboprop about the size of a Cessna Caravan single pilot IFR at flight level 500 or more. But I am not sure if that is correct, is that the typical mission? I would bet we are single pilot but are we taking it high all the time?

Thanks

USMCFLYR 08-13-2020 06:44 AM


Originally Posted by PA16 (Post 3109397)
This brings up a question.. I was going to reply to the why to they want 1500 hours and a checkride.. my answer was you are flying a turboprop about the size of a Cessna Caravan single pilot IFR at flight level 500 or more. But I am not sure if that is correct, is that the typical mission? I would bet we are single pilot but are we taking it high all the time?

Thanks

You will get more complete answers soon from those who have worked with and/or flown Predator's, but the type of UAVs that CBP flies don't go up to FL500.

"U.S. Customs and Border Protection was reported in 2013 to be operating 10 Predators and to have requested 14 more.[41][42] "

Here is a link to the Wiki article on the Predator
:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genera..._MQ-1_Predator

Here is the fact sheet with some stats:
Performance
Maximum speed: 117 kn (135 mph, 217 km/h)
Cruise speed: 70 kn (81 mph, 130 km/h) to 90 kn (100 mph; 170 km/h)
Stall speed: 54 kn (62 mph, 100 km/h)
Range: 675 nmi (777 mi, 1,250 km)
Endurance: 24 hours[1]
Service ceiling: 25,000 ft (7,600 m)

And MQ-9s Predator B:
U.S. Homeland Security​[edit]




U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Predator B





CBP's Predator B




CBP's maritime variant of the Predator B, named "Guardian"




File:CPB UAS Sample Surveillance Video 02282008 .theora.ogv
Play media

A CBP Predator B helps direct border agents towards a migrant group crossing the US-Mexico border, c. February 2008

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) operated nine MQ-9s in August 2012. Two were based in North Dakota at Grand Forks Air Force Base, four were based in Arizona, at Fort Huachuca and one was based at the Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Texas.[80] These aircraft were equipped with GA-ASI's Lynx synthetic aperture radar and Raytheon's MTS-B electro-optical infrared sensors.[81] CBP also had two maritime MQ-9s called Guardians, based at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida and Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Texas.[82] The Guardians were equipped with the SeaVue marine search radar; their electro-optical infrared sensor was optimized for maritime operations.[80] The CBP operates one MQ-9 Guardian jointly with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) out of land-based stations in Florida and Texas.[83]

The United States Department of Homeland Security initially ordered one Predator B for border protection duty, referred to as MQ-9 CBP-101. It began operations 4 October 2005 and crashed in the Arizona desert on 25 April 2006. The US's NTSB determined that the crash's most likely cause was pilot error by the ground-based pilot, inadvertently shutting down the UAV's engine by failing to follow the checklist.[84] During its operational period, the aircraft flew 959 hours on patrol and played a role in 2,309 arrests. It also contributed to the seizure of four vehicles and 8,267 pounds (3,750 kg) of marijuana.[85]

A second Predator B, called "CBP-104" (initially referred to as "CBP-102"), was delivered in September 2006 and commenced limited border protection operations on 18 October 2006. The president's FY2006 emergency supplemental budget request added $45 million for the program and the FY2007 Homeland Security Appropriations Bill added an additional $20 million. In October 2006, GA-ASI announced a $33.9 million contract to supply two more Predator B systems by the fall of 2007.[86] On 16 February 2009, the program was further expanded to include patrols of the Canada–US border.[87]

On 14 October 2013, an MQ-9 began patrolling the Manitoba portion of the U.S.-Canada border. The UAV is based at Grand Forks Air Force Base and will watch the 400 km (250 mi)-long border. The drone will not carry weapons and needs permission to enter Canadian airspace. U.S. authorities fear that drug smugglers, migrants, and terrorists may exploit the long border. The use of the unmanned surveillance aircraft is an enhancement of the partnership between U.S. and Canadian agencies.[88]

In January 2014, Customs and Border Protection grounded its UAVs temporarily after an unmanned aircraft was ditched off the coast of California by the operator due to a mechanical failure on 27 January 2014.[89]

DustoffVT 08-13-2020 09:15 AM


Originally Posted by Benjibelt (Post 3109202)
do you know why the require 1500 and to do a flight check if they are just going to put you on a UAS?


I would say this question pretty much answers itself.

To add to Diver’s post: you can add mission management & dynamic risk assesment to all of that. You are being hired to fly an extremely complex aircraft, owned by the taxpayers, in direct support of high level national security operations. I would say 1500 is low to even understand the weight placed on your shoulders.


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