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Old 02-16-2006, 05:17 PM   #1  
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Default Type rating worth anything??

Anybody know if a type rating in the C-130 would be of any value when applying for an airline job?? Would that help me when trying to get a type in another aircraft?? Thanks for any replies
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Old 02-16-2006, 06:18 PM   #2  
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Any Type is helpful if nothing else it proves that you poses the mental capacity to get one.

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Old 02-16-2006, 06:36 PM   #3  
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Any type is better than no type. Unless you have a 737 type with no operational experience and are applying somwhere OTHER than SWA...that would be hard to explain.
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Old 02-16-2006, 07:55 PM   #4  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyHigh

Any Type is helpful if nothing else it proves that you poses the mental capacity to get one.

SkyHigh
Being able to spell is also helpful.








Unless the company is flying the type, it offers no particular advantage. the fact that you've completed the formal training course to get you where you are now is evidence enough of the mental capacity required. If it's convenient to get the type, I'd go ahead just for the fun of it. But if it's a big hassle or will cost you a lot of money, I'd pass.

HOURS -- that's what matters.





- The truth only hurts if it should -
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Old 02-16-2006, 08:15 PM   #5  
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I agree with TonyC, unless you have something lined up with a company like Lynden (out of ANC) and a L-382 type would close the deal....I'd pass.
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Old 02-16-2006, 09:21 PM   #6  
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The type should be free (I'm basing this on the ability to convert military currency into FAA certificates through your local FSDO, although I haven't looked at that reg since about mid-1999).

Having a type is beneficial when it comes to certain future qualifications - first off it is an irrefutable thing on your record for any future instructor/examiner (as opposed to military flight records which you probably don't carry around to a checkride). Second, having a type rating allows you to complete training towards another type rating without having to complete a 15% ride in the actual aircraft if you use a simulator for your training/checkride.
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Old 02-17-2006, 06:06 AM   #7  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyerJosh

The type should be free (I'm basing this on the ability to convert military currency into FAA certificates through your local FSDO, although I haven't looked at that reg since about mid-1999).
"Free" is all relative. If you're already standing in the FSDO talking to the guy that can do it, then the price will be just the time that it takes. If you have no other purpose to visit the FSDO, then the price begins to go up. If the FSDO is in town, then you've got a minor expenditure for gas. If it's 200 miles away, the price climbs considerably. Since having the type rating is of so little value, it will be up to the individual to determine if the cost and hassle is worth it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyerJosh

Having a type is beneficial when it comes to certain future qualifications - first off it is an irreputable thing on your record ...
Reputable means "enjoying good repute" or "held in esteem." The prefix "ir-" is used to indicate the opposite of the root word, suggesting, in this case, that the thing is NOT "enjoying good repute" or NOT "held in esteem." Personally, I'd pass on anything on my resume that would fit that description. Lucky for you, the word irreputable is not actually a word, so we must assume a misspelling of a proper word. Perhaps you meant "irrefutable," meaning "impossible to refute" or "incontrovertible" as in "incontrovertible proof."

I alluded to the ability to effectively communicate with the written word in my previous post on this thread, specifically pointing out the need to be able to spell. I believe this skill is far more important than having a Type Rating on the resume, unless the employer operates that type.

Contrary to what rickair7777 said, I don't think having any particular Type Rating is a negative in any way. His comment would have you believe that such a pilot applying to, say UPS, would have a hard time explaining why he has a 737 Type Rating. HOGWASH. Anybody would be a fool to think that he should only apply to one single airline, and no other, and intentionally NOT prepare himself for possible employment with an excellent carrier. Nobody at UPS or FedEx or JetBlue or any other employer is going to disqualify a candidate because he was covering as many bases as he could. We all know what they say about the fool that puts all his eggs in one basket.

And as I also mentioned before, having the hours logged in the airplane is quite sufficient to meet the requirements of any employer, save an employer that specifically requires that type for employment. Nobody needs the "FSDO stamp" to make those hours any more real or any more valid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyerJosh

Second, IIRC, having a type rating allows you to complete training towards another type rating without having to complete a 15% ride in the actual aircraft if you use a level C simulator for your training/checkride.
Can you share a reference for that? I had a Type rating in a 707 and 720 (neither of which I have actually touched) that provided no such benefit. Having 300 hours as PIC in turbine aircraft DID provide a benefit when it came to High Minimums as a newly-minted Part 121 Captain, but the type ratings (those and the MD-11 type I had also acquired by then) did nothing to abbreviate the training.




- The truth only hurts if it should -
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Old 02-17-2006, 12:08 PM   #8  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyC
"Free" is all relative. If you're already standing in the FSDO talking to the guy that can do it, then the price will be just the time that it takes. If you have no other purpose to visit the FSDO, then the price begins to go up. If the FSDO is in town, then you've got a minor expenditure for gas. If it's 200 miles away, the price climbs considerably. Since having the type rating is of so little value, it will be up to the individual to determine if the cost and hassle is worth it.
I'll grant you "free is relative". However since a type rating costs upwards of $7K (and as high as $35K), it's probably worth the travel expenses. Most military crewmembers will need to make the trip to a FSDO anyway to convert military competancy to FAA certificates. Why not knock out two birds with one stone?

Quote:
Reputable means "enjoying good repute" or "held in esteem." The prefix "ir-" is used to indicate the opposite of the root word, suggesting, in this case, that the thing is NOT "enjoying good repute" or NOT "held in esteem." Personally, I'd pass on anything on my resume that would fit that description. Lucky for you, the word irreputable is not actually a word, so we must assume a misspelling of a proper word. Perhaps you meant "irrefutable," meaning "impossible to refute" or "incontrovertible" as in "incontrovertible proof."
You caught me there. I meant to say "irrefutable"... guess my vocabulary isn't as great as yours (Particularly at midnight).

Quote:
Can you share a reference for that? I had a Type rating in a 707 and 720 (neither of which I have actually touched) that provided no such benefit. Having 300 hours as PIC in turbine aircraft DID provide a benefit when it came to High Minimums as a newly-minted Part 121 Captain, but the type ratings (those and the MD-11 type I had also acquired by then) did nothing to abbreviate the training.
FARs 61.63 (for commercial pilots) and 61.157(g) (for ATPs) covers the particular requirements that dictate whether or not a 15% ride in an actual aircraft is required. Level C and D simulators require 15% rides if certain experience requirments haven't been met. (There is a long list of requirements that can be met in both the regs)

I relooked over the reg, and since presumably Herc130AV8R, has a military designation to act as pilot in command any future type rides are probably exempt.

As for you, you were probably exempt due to flight time experience or some other reason.

----------------------------------------------

As a side note, it is probably worth getting the type rating if it's not a big trouble or hassle simply because if Herc130AV8R can't get a job flying for an airline right away, there are numerous overseas contract jobs flying or instructing in the C130 that are available to former servicemembers. (These are often flying/instructing for foreign allied nations that have purchased equipment from the US). Many of these contracts are quite lucrative financially, and often require type ratings and US certificates (as well as often requiring current qualifications).

~J
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Old 02-17-2006, 12:11 PM   #9  
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Since I have the regs open, I figured that I would also post the regs that pertain to converting military qualifications to FAA certificates:

§ 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.
(a) General. Except for a rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who has been removed from flying status for lack of proficiency, or because of disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who meets the applicable requirements of this section may apply, on the basis of his or her military training, for:

(1) A commercial pilot certificate;

(2) An aircraft rating in the category and class of aircraft for which that military pilot is qualified;

(3) An instrument rating with the appropriate aircraft rating for which that military pilot is qualified; or

(4) A type rating, if appropriate.

(b) Military pilots on active flying status within the past 12 months. A rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who has been on active flying status within the 12 months before applying must:

(1) Pass a knowledge test on the appropriate parts of this chapter that apply to pilot privileges and limitations, air traffic and general operating rules, and accident reporting rules;

(2) Present documentation showing compliance with the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section for at least one aircraft category rating; and

(3) Present documentation showing that the applicant is or was, at any time during the 12 calendar months before the month of application—

(i) A rated military pilot on active flying status in an armed force of the United States; or

(ii) A rated military pilot of an armed force of a foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, assigned to pilot duties (other than flight training) with an armed force of the United States and holds, at the time of application, a current civil pilot license issued by that contracting State authorizing at least the privileges of the pilot certificate sought.

(c) Military pilots not on active flying status during the 12 calendar months before the month of application. A rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who has not been on active flying status within the 12 calendar months before the month of application must:

(1) Pass the appropriate knowledge and practical tests prescribed in this part for the certificate or rating sought; and

(2) Present documentation showing that the applicant was, before the beginning of the 12th calendar month before the month of application, a rated military pilot as prescribed by paragraph (b)(3)(i) or paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section.

(d) Aircraft category, class, and type ratings. A rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who applies for an aircraft category, class, or type rating, if applicable, is issued that rating at the commercial pilot certificate level if the pilot presents documentary evidence that shows satisfactory accomplishment of:

(1) An official U.S. military pilot check and instrument proficiency check in that aircraft category, class, or type, if applicable, as pilot in command during the 12 calendar months before the month of application;

(2) At least 10 hours of pilot-in-command time in that aircraft category, class, or type, if applicable, during the 12 calendar months before the month of application; or

(3) An FAA practical test in that aircraft after—

(i) Meeting the requirements of paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section; and

(ii) Having received an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the pilot is proficient to take the required practical test, and that endorsement is made within the 60-day period preceding the date of the practical test.

(e) Instrument rating. A rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who applies for an airplane instrument rating, a helicopter instrument rating, or a powered-lift instrument rating to be added to his or her commercial pilot certificate may apply for an instrument rating if the pilot has, within the 12 calendar months preceding the month of application:

(1) Passed an instrument proficiency check by a U.S. Armed Force in the aircraft category for the instrument rating sought; and

(2) Received authorization from a U.S. Armed Force to conduct IFR flights on Federal airways in that aircraft category and class for the instrument rating sought.

(f) Aircraft type rating. An aircraft type rating is issued only for aircraft types that the Administrator has certificated for civil operations.

(g) Aircraft type rating placed on an airline transport pilot certificate. A rated military pilot or former rated military pilot who holds an airline transport pilot certificate and who requests an aircraft type rating to be placed on that person's airline transport pilot certificate may be issued that aircraft type rating at the airline transport pilot certificate level, provided that person:

(1) Holds a category and class rating for that type of aircraft at the airline transport pilot certificate level; and

(2) Passed an official U.S. military pilot check and instrument proficiency check in that type of aircraft as pilot in command during the 12 calendar months before the month of application.

(h) Evidentiary documents. The following documents are satisfactory evidence for the purposes indicated:

(1) An official identification card issued to the pilot by an armed force may be used to demonstrate membership in the armed forces.

(2) An original or a copy of a certificate of discharge or release may be used to demonstrate discharge or release from an armed force or former membership in an armed force.

(3) Current or previous status as a rated military pilot with a U.S. Armed Force may be demonstrated by—

(i) An official U.S. Armed Force order to flight status as a military pilot;

(ii) An official U.S. Armed Force form or logbook showing military pilot status; or

(iii) An official order showing that the rated military pilot graduated from a U.S. military pilot school and received a rating as a military pilot.

(4) A certified U.S. Armed Force logbook or an appropriate official U.S. Armed Force form or summary may be used to demonstrate flight time in military aircraft as a member of a U.S. Armed Force.

(5) An official U.S. Armed Force record of a military checkout as pilot in command may be used to demonstrate pilot in command status.

(6) A current instrument grade slip that is issued by a U.S. Armed Force, or an official record of satisfactory accomplishment of an instrument proficiency check during the 12 calendar months preceding the month of the application may be used to demonstrate instrument pilot qualification.
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Old 02-17-2006, 02:57 PM   #10  
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Man...get your type. If you dont live near a FSDO then you're bound to crew rest near one or have one near your hometown or something. Bottom line is its painless and basically free since you already have all the training required. I was in the FSDO office less than 10 mins. It probably wont help with an airline gig but you never know when it may come in handy for something else. I've got my Lear and Beech types and I may never need them but I do know a couple of charter outfits that would look favorably on them...you never know
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