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Part 135 Part 135 commercial operators

Ameriflight

Old 05-14-2014, 02:57 PM
  #1851  
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Originally Posted by KSCessnaDriver
If you had done any research, at all, you would have know this coming into the company. To me, it sounds like you showed up knowing nothing about the company, then acted all surprised when it wasn't like 121.



It's laughable if you think what Ameriflight does is abuse. My previous job it wasn't uncommon to be stuck flying 12 hours, single pilot, living in a hotel all year. So yeah, you don't know jack about real pilot abuse.
It's been a pretty good gig for me....
Just saying, it's what you make of it.
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:20 PM
  #1852  
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Originally Posted by KSCessnaDriver
If you had done any research, at all, you would have know this coming into the company. To me, it sounds like you showed up knowing nothing about the company, then acted all surprised when it wasn't like 121.

If the per diem is coming means that is not there yet!

So at the moment you make more money in a Regional at the first year pay.
Let's remember that at AMF the pay raise is 1$ per hour after one year so from 18 to 19$ an hour, in a regional in general you go from 22-25$ per hour to 30-40 $ an hour the second year, plus per diem. So, once again, you won't be rich but you'll still make more money in a regional.

It's laughable if you think what Ameriflight does is abuse. My previous job it wasn't uncommon to be stuck flying 12 hours, single pilot, living in a hotel all year. So yeah, you don't know jack about real pilot abuse.
Abuse is not when you are in line 12 hours but it's when they make you do jobs that are not yours, and of course they don't tell you in advance but only when you are in and you have a training contract.

Yes, it's true i don't know everything, like i guess you do , i'm just reporting my experience.

The blog readers will judge if AMF is right for them or not.
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:32 PM
  #1853  
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Originally Posted by USMCFLYR
I spent the better part of 20 years in a cockpit by myself and I'd say that the crew coordiantion aspect of transition was the easiest part of the training/differences in adapting to multi-pilot cockpit procedures.
Very good for you.
Unfortunately for somebody else the fact that they have been flying by themselves for years was a problem. They did not pass the sim training because they were not able to coordinate a course of action with the other pilot. They did everything by themselves.

The problem may be that after you have been the Capt. of yourself you a long time, you may have a problem been the SIC of somebody else maybe younger than you who is the Capt.
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:35 PM
  #1854  
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Originally Posted by aTomatoFlames
If your goal is 121 I don't think AMF is the best choice. Its not a bad choice, and you will gain experience that you other wise wouldn't have. But you're also loosing seneiority and better QOL as you wait. I have had two completely different experience at AMF. My first base was great; schedule was ok If you weren't building time, layovers were awesome, and I had a lot of fun. I dislike my new run, I work six days a week, have to fill a 99 five days a week, and my show time is was to early. Dispatch has left me stranded on more then one occasion at my first base (I believe that had more to do with base dispatch as opposed AMF dispatch as a whole).

In short AMF isn't for everybody and just be prepared when you decided to work here. At the same time I complain I knew what I was getting into and I choose to build for my current gig so can I really complain?
Agree, AMF is not for everyone so before applying there make your research.

AMF is a big company so things are really different from base to base.
My experience was the worst i had in my flying career.
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:57 PM
  #1855  
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Originally Posted by Pilotandrew
Maybe you should be concerned about inability to fly an aircraft on steam gauges. Not everything you will fly in your career will have a pretty glass screen showing you exactly what to do.
Sorry for you, but i forgot to metion.
In my group I WAS THE ONLY ONE TO PASS THE TRAINING.
Yes i do know how to fly steam gauges! The things that happend to me, happend after I finished the training.
One of the reason your flying career can finish even before starting is because if you don't pass a part 135 or part 121 training, the next company will have problem hiring and spending money to give a type rating to a pilot who has already failed a training!!!
So the headsup for the one who want to apply to AMF is make sure you are 200% proficient with steam gauges before you apply.
Second if your final goal is not to retire as an AMF pilot, be advided that the rest of the worl, Major, Regional, Cargo, etc. FLY GLASS and they really like you to have experience with FMS, ACARS, a working autopilt, etc...
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:59 PM
  #1856  
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Originally Posted by pilotrob84
I agree. My time here is not bad at all.
Is not bad at all doesn't mean that you had a good time.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:01 PM
  #1857  
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Originally Posted by Stryker
I've flown glass for a majority of my career and I get sick of it... Steam gauges make a good pilot, and by default weed out poor ones.
Steam gauges makes a good pilot and i agree.
Problem is that if you want to go somewhere else the worl flys glass and the good companies also want you to have experience on GLASS, ACAR, FMS etc... that unfortunatelly you don't have at AMF.
Another problem you may encounter is that if you spend more than a year at a single pilot job, you'll get used you to fly by yourself so much that the day you want to do another job and you'll be in a cockpit with another pilot (which by the way are the most of the jobs out there) wou may not be used to crew coordination anymore and you'll have a problem during training.
That's what happend in the regional where i work right now.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:27 PM
  #1858  
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Originally Posted by kimba
Steam gauges makes a good pilot and i agree.
Problem is that if you want to go somewhere else the worl flys glass and the good companies also want you to have experience on GLASS, ACAR, FMS etc... that unfortunatelly you don't have at AMF.
Another problem you may encounter is that if you spend more than a year at a single pilot job, you'll get used you to fly by yourself so much that the day you want to do another job and you'll be in a cockpit with another pilot (which by the way are the most of the jobs out there) wou may not be used to crew coordination anymore and you'll have a problem during training.
That's what happend in the regional where i work right now.

Completely and respectfully disagree. American flies steam gauge MD-80s. Delta flies steam gauge MD-80s. Northwest flew steam gauge DC-9s. If you are fortunate enough to get hired at Delta or American you will probably fly the MD-80 and from what I've seen, the CRJ/ERJ "glass" guys have the most trouble.

Ameriflight was the best career building move I made. I came with 1,300 hours. Stayed 3 years. Left with over 3,000 hours Total Time, 1,300 Turbine PIC, an ATP, two type ratings in the Metro and Brasilia.

I flew all single pilot until the Brasilia and the transition to two crew was nothing spectacular. Going from single pilot to two crew was way easier.

FMS? Never used one until my current job. It was easy to use and is very user friendly and mostly self explanitory.

Currently I am an MD-80 Captain. I have flown with First Officers who have mostly single pilot time and enjoyed every minute of it. I have flown with First Officers with a gazillion hours at XYZ Regional in the CRJ that make me want to pound my head into a wall. Likewise I have flown with awful single pilot guys and excellent CRJ guys. It all depends and going to one or the other does not "make you".

I know pilots personally from Ameriflight that left to go to Southwest. Virgin. Cathay. UPS. Continental. Allegiant. Northwest. Etc. It was and still is a small pilot group and not everyone is going to be moving on to those places. That's just plain numbers.

Point is, it all boils down to natural ability, attitude and personality. Getting hired boils down to who you know and how well you interview. Flying a jet with glass is not hard. Flying a jet with steam gauges is not hard. Flying anything with an FMS is not hard.

I would prefer to fly with a single pilot freight guy with a good personality over a regional "glass guy" any day.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:55 PM
  #1859  
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Originally Posted by j3cub
Completely and respectfully disagree. American flies steam gauge MD-80s. Delta flies steam gauge MD-80s. Northwest flew steam gauge DC-9s. If you are fortunate enough to get hired at Delta or American you will probably fly the MD-80 and from what I've seen, the CRJ/ERJ "glass" guys have the most trouble.

Ameriflight was the best career building move I made. I came with 1,300 hours. Stayed 3 years. Left with over 3,000 hours Total Time, 1,300 Turbine PIC, an ATP, two type ratings in the Metro and Brasilia.

I flew all single pilot until the Brasilia and the transition to two crew was nothing spectacular. Going from single pilot to two crew was way easier.

FMS? Never used one until my current job. It was easy to use and is very user friendly and mostly self explanitory.

Currently I am an MD-80 Captain. I have flown with First Officers who have mostly single pilot time and enjoyed every minute of it. I have flown with First Officers with a gazillion hours at XYZ Regional in the CRJ that make me want to pound my head into a wall. Likewise I have flown with awful single pilot guys and excellent CRJ guys. It all depends and going to one or the other does not "make you".

I know pilots personally from Ameriflight that left to go to Southwest. Virgin. Cathay. UPS. Continental. Allegiant. Northwest. Etc. It was and still is a small pilot group and not everyone is going to be moving on to those places. That's just plain numbers.

Point is, it all boils down to natural ability, attitude and personality. Getting hired boils down to who you know and how well you interview. Flying a jet with glass is not hard. Flying a jet with steam gauges is not hard. Flying anything with an FMS is not hard.

I would prefer to fly with a single pilot freight guy with a good personality over a regional "glass guy" any day.
Very good, i'm really happy for you and i've appreciate your replay.

My point is not what it was yesterday but what is today.
Major are not looking for turbine PIC which is the main thing why pilots go AMF. Of course if you are a good pilot with a good personality you interview, been hired an pass any training.
Point is that today turbine PIC is not necessary to apply to a major, then if they call you and you pass the interview is not only related to what you did before but on how good you interview.
Any flying experience is important and has a lot to teach if you are open to learn and AMF has a lot to teach.
I just don't understand how come that AMF pilot and training Capt. leave to go regional?

MD80 may have steam gauges, you know better than me, but is that the future? Or Boeing and Airbus are?

As a MD 80 Capt, how many pilot did you see going from AMF straight to major, in percentage? More or less?
I think they ares till a small group.
Thank you for your post.
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:18 PM
  #1860  
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I'm confused here. You said you did some time with AMF then left, and vented your frustrations. Now, why do you continue to try to make the company out to be a bad place, when it's very obvious that you jumped into the deep end without knowing how to swim. What vested interest do you have in trashing the place?
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