Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ. Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free.


User Tag List

Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-31-2017, 07:48 PM   #191  
Gets Weekends Off
 
USMCFLYR's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Mar 2008
Position: FAA 'Flight Check'
Posts: 11,640
Default

I had my medical a few days ago. My AME is the former head of the Medical Cert branch. For the first time I had to fill out a form with OSA questions. I answered them and turned in the form. Being that this was the first time to see him since our former 'flight surgeon' retired, I wasn't surprised that the medical was a little more in-depth than others had been when I had been seen the last guy for 7 years, but no fuss, no mess so far. Just relating my recent experience.
USMCFLYR is offline  
Old 11-02-2017, 11:06 AM   #192  
Gets Weekends Off
 
USMCFLYR's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Mar 2008
Position: FAA 'Flight Check'
Posts: 11,640
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MedicalTruth View Post
I learned more about flying from chain smoking - whiskey swillin fat fuks, than I ever did from a pin head.

In fact, there are many intersections named after such people, and their children...

nuff said.

The FAA needs to get their sh't together if they want to keep the world flying.
True in many ways..........but remember that it isn't the FAA's mission any longer to "keep the world flying"

You can blame the lawyers for much of that.
USMCFLYR is offline  
Old 12-14-2017, 04:18 PM   #193  
On Reserve
 
Joined APC: Oct 2017
Posts: 10
Default OSA Assessment

This week I saw a Pulmonologist/Sleep Doctor to complete an OSA assessment. I was expecting that he would set me up with a sleep study but he did not. Based on his assessment he concluded that I am at a low risk for sleep apnea.

I have until January 16th to get a letter submitted to the FAA. This doctor said he would write a letter but he has never dealt with the FAA. He asked me what the FAA will need to see in this letter. Is there specific information the FAA requires in letter after an OSA assessment?

Thanks
arnoldaj74 is offline  
Old 12-15-2017, 09:30 AM   #194  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Aug 2016
Posts: 115
Default OSA

Something to the essence of patient does not appear to suffer from symptoms of OSA based on my evaluation.
Bucknut is offline  
Old 04-14-2018, 10:25 PM   #195  
New Hire
 
Joined APC: Apr 2018
Posts: 1
Default Your BMI is not the real issue, Obese Pilots

The issue is not obesity it is that you are flying without proper rest, or more serious you could die, Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person's breathing is interrupted during sleep. People with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times. This means the brain -- and the rest of the body -- may not get enough oxygen. If you have sleep apnea and it is treated usually with a CPAP machine you will get your medical, the FAA however does not want you flying if you have OSA untreated.
Wmpullen is offline  
Old 04-15-2018, 05:45 PM   #196  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,944
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmpullen View Post
The issue is not obesity it is that you are flying without proper rest, or more serious you could die, Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person's breathing is interrupted during sleep. People with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times. This means the brain -- and the rest of the body -- may not get enough oxygen. If you have sleep apnea and it is treated usually with a CPAP machine you will get your medical, the FAA however does not want you flying if you have OSA untreated.
Kind of depends on the severity though:

Association of obstructive sleep apnoea with the risk of vascular outcomes and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis | BMJ Open

Milder forms of OSA simply do not warrant active treatment. Nor do the statistics indicate progression to more severe forms in the absence of treatment.
Excargodog is offline  
Old 10-03-2018, 02:36 PM   #197  
On Reserve
 
Joined APC: Sep 2018
Posts: 16
Default

Quick question about whether I should report Sleep Apnea on my medical questionnaire or even bring it up. I was tested for sleep apnea last year and the results were inconclusive, but leaning toward "it doesn't look like you have sleep apnea". However, my doctor wanted me to get another study done to verify for some reason.

I am looking at getting my 1st class medical soon after a long hiatus, and just want to make sure I cross my I's and dot my T's before I go in. I just had a physical and everything checked out, but I still have the Sleep Apnea thing on my record, even though it was inconclusive.

So what would be the best course of action here?
Mikeyrb1 is offline  
Old 10-03-2018, 03:14 PM   #198  
Prime Minister/Moderator
 
rickair7777's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Engines Turn Or People Swim
Posts: 23,831
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeyrb1 View Post
Quick question about whether I should report Sleep Apnea on my medical questionnaire or even bring it up. I was tested for sleep apnea last year and the results were inconclusive, but leaning toward "it doesn't look like you have sleep apnea". However, my doctor wanted me to get another study done to verify for some reason.

I am looking at getting my 1st class medical soon after a long hiatus, and just want to make sure I cross my I's and dot my T's before I go in. I just had a physical and everything checked out, but I still have the Sleep Apnea thing on my record, even though it was inconclusive.

So what would be the best course of action here?
I don't think you have a choice. You have to report the consultation with a health-care provider regardless. That will lead to a discussion of the findings, and you don't want to lie...

Since the doc left you in limbo, I would recommend doing the follow-ups and get a definitive answer BEFORE you get a medical. I can just about guarantee you that "doesn't think you have it, but wants more tests" = denied medical. FAA is pretty hard-over on OSA right now, that and mental health are the hot-buttons du jour.

You might consult with AOPA, AMAS, etc.

If you do have OSA, you can probably fly with treatment (but that might be an SI).
rickair7777 is offline  
Old 10-03-2018, 04:13 PM   #199  
On Reserve
 
Joined APC: Sep 2018
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickair7777 View Post
I don't think you have a choice. You have to report the consultation with a health-care provider regardless. That will lead to a discussion of the findings, and you don't want to lie...

Since the doc left you in limbo, I would recommend doing the follow-ups and get a definitive answer BEFORE you get a medical. I can just about guarantee you that "doesn't think you have it, but wants more tests" = denied medical. FAA is pretty hard-over on OSA right now, that and mental health are the hot-buttons du jour.

You might consult with AOPA, AMAS, etc.

If you do have OSA, you can probably fly with treatment (but that might be an SI).
Thanks. Yeah, I need to talk to the doc and get some closure. He ordered another sleep study (in lab this time) but insurance won't cover it and it is like $6K which I am not paying.

I think I might just need to get a second opinion from another doc really, and try to get a confirmation that I don't have OSA. Annoying because I brought it up a few years ago because my wife complained about snoring and then he ordered the study.

I'm really not even at risk. 26 BMI and pretty healthy overall. No problems sleeping or breathing other than snoring sometimes but that's not every night.
Mikeyrb1 is offline  
Old 10-03-2018, 11:32 PM   #200  
Line Holder
 
Joined APC: Jun 2006
Posts: 80
Default

I went through a similar problem with my SI not long ago. I had a stroke in 2016 and the neurologist ordered a sleep study. The study came back just above the FAA limit at 18.7 but the doctor never prescribed any CPAP therapy. When I sent in my SI application the FAA said I had to have therapy because I was above the 15 AHI limit. Since it had been a year and a half since the first study, I did a in home study with RPM (rpmhst.com) due to the cost of a in lab study and it came back positive too. I paid $150 for the home study and around $600 for the Airsense10. They do not take insurance, but will do $300-$325 depending on the machine and $50 a month for six months. Be sure to sign up for their email specials, that saved me another $100 on my machine. It also comes with a free mask of your choice (I like the dreamwear because the hose is on top of your head not your face and causes less disturbance at night if you toss and turn in your sleep) plus lifetime monitoring, just be sure to tell them it for the FAA, they had to change a few perimeters on mine from their normal CDL setup. Good luck, as long as you do what the FAA requires for usage, you should have no problem.
rpatte1637 is offline  
 
 
 

 
Post Reply

Tags
faa, medical, new guidelines, sleep, sleep apnea
 



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
UPS 747 Dubai Final Report RealityCheck Safety 70 08-18-2013 05:04 PM
SWA into EWR OnTheKlacker Major 208 09-09-2010 01:36 AM
Stringent FAA medical guidelines, recipe for disaster Brian3613 Pilot Health 10 06-27-2008 06:52 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:14 AM.