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Tool of the day

Old 02-26-2014, 05:21 AM
  #5021  
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Originally Posted by tsquare
No... what you are displaying is a high level of immaturity. I absolutely hated learning to draw the electrical schematic system on the 727. Hated it. Felt exactly the same way as you are now advocating as a matter of fact. Now... 20 years later, I see there was a purpose in it. You are a classic end user. As long as it works, you're good to go. If there's a problem, somebody (hopefully) has figured out what to do, and will tell you. That is quite sad actually... and someday you might understand. It has nothing to do with going back to the glory days of the 60s or anything like that. It has to do with knowing your airplane. We are losing that part of our professionalism. Reading a checklist might be fine for you, but I prefer knowing more about my craft. An FO can be replaced with a fresh out of a six week "crash course" on reading English if things continue down the road you seem to adore. Fine with me, YOU are gonna have to keep your eye on 'em so that they don't throw down the gear mid flight, or shut down an engine or two.... because , hey, "there's a checklist for restarting the engine.. I saw it in the sim"....

Oh, and I don't have any kids....
I really fail to see how drawing out and memorizing the electrical schematic has any practicality.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:23 AM
  #5022  
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Useless information is stuff that hasn't happened to you..............yet.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:29 AM
  #5023  
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Originally Posted by badflaps
Useless information is stuff that hasn't happened to you..............yet.
Exactly my point.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:31 AM
  #5024  
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Originally Posted by CanoePilot
I really fail to see how drawing out and memorizing the electrical schematic has any practicality.

Of course you do. What practicality does landing in the first third of the runway have either, after all at JFK you have over 10,000 on just about every one. You NEVER use all of it, right? Just float and be sure you get that greaser...... you'll be fine.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:33 AM
  #5025  
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[QUOTE=ClarenceOver;1589939]
Originally Posted by tsquare
You're young (obviously). There is no such thing as "useless info" when it concerns your aircraft. There might not be anything you can necessarily do about a particular malfunction, but by having the level of systems knowledge that Captjns talks about, you can KNOW how your craft has been affected by the loss of a system or component. What you are alluding to is one of the things that are eroding the importance of our profession. Pilots are becoming button pushing monkeys. When all you have to do is read a checklist, and push the right button or throw the right switch, and live with the consequences of those actions; an intelligent thinking being at the controls is really not necessary. Couple that with dispatch making your divert decisions for you and what are we left with? Maybe you are comfortable with that. Frankly, I'm not. Over the North Atlantic in the middle of the night, as a passenger I would want to believe that there is a competent individual at the controls, not just someone that had a "crash course" in flying. Perhaps it is coming to that, and you as a "professional" feel that minimal knowledge about your aircraft is sufficient. If that is the case and that feeling is more rampant out there, it does not bode well for the future of this industry as a well paying one. Anybody that can read will do. As a matter of fact, they could put 1 "captain" onboard, and sell the FO seat to anybody that can read and is willing to sit up front for the entire flight...

How long is the escape rope on the crj200? Why are there v1 cuts on 13000 foot runways? What is the best way to use the symbol generator display? What is the tire pressure? How long are N1 blades? Ill try and think of some more stupid pointless questions while you answer these.
I can answer 3 of the 5. But like your compadre, you totally miss the point. It is your future that is being marginalized. You are the ones that are dumbing down the profession. If you really believe you deserve $300k for simply reading a checklist, you are incredibly naive. Compensation comes from having a skill or knowledge that is unique to individuals performing a given task or trade. Reading English is not unique.


And I really hope you go down the road of being paid a lot "just in case something bad happens"....... I'd love to have that discussion....

"These are the good old days".
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:33 AM
  #5026  
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Originally Posted by Boomer
I never understood the FAA's hydroplaning formula. It doesn't take into account the depth of contaminant, runway design, aircraft weight, tire width or distance between them on the gear assy, tire tread (or lack thereof)...

If TP is the only factor in hydroplaning, bald tires would be fine on your car as long as they're pumped up really good...


How do I know my tire pressure anyways? I ran a corporate jet that had the tire pressure gauge on the main so you could read how they were doing. And in all honesty, I wanted to rip those things off. The tolerances are so dad-gum small that a normal fluctuation in temperature put you on the edge of needing the tire replaced if someone spot checked you.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:46 AM
  #5027  
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My first airline Captain Checkout was a 727 part 121 ride. I left that ride knowing I had flown a thoroughly tough checkride. The first one was supposed to be rough according to the culture of my airline and so, it was. But I nailed it both giving me the confidence that I could excel and also giving the examiner confidence in his sign off.

So I do agree that our current system is much easier than those days. I do not have to learn every tiny nuance of the electrical system to pass a rigorous oral exam. Today my 100 question system exam takes the orals place. Economically better for the employer and easier on me. But, being reared by Grandpa Pettibone and the airline professionals that mentored me as a SO/FO, I still learn more than the minimum. I draw out a new airplane's electrical system (et al) to memorize it. Crazy I know. But learning more than the minimum is what makes and keeps me a professional. Those future Captains that don't get it make me sad for this awesome profession.

Oh, to keep this on track thread wise; past experience on PA = tool.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:47 AM
  #5028  
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Originally Posted by CanoePilot
I really fail to see how drawing out and memorizing the electrical schematic has any practicality.
I'm a sponge when it comes to the how/why each aircraft system works. A very small sponge.

But I draw the line when it comes to "what gauge wire goes from the Turbo Encabulator to the Weenil Sprocket?" Or "How many Manesticaly-spaced grouting brushes are there in the Metapolar Refractive Pillometer?"

Rockwelll transmission incabulator - YouTube
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:53 AM
  #5029  
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Originally Posted by tsquare

I can answer 3 of the 5. But like your compadre, you totally miss the point. It is your future that is being marginalized. You are the ones that are dumbing down the profession. If you really believe you deserve $300k for simply reading a checklist, you are incredibly naive. Compensation comes from having a skill or knowledge that is unique to individuals performing a given task or trade. Reading English is not unique.


And I really hope you go down the road of being paid a lot "just in case something bad happens"....... I'd love to have that discussion....

"These are the good old days".
"Dumbing down" because we don't want to learn pointless trivia about our airplane? We don't think we deserve 300k to fly an airplane because we know what blue juice is made out of. We deserve 300k because in this job we're stuck working crap hours and forced to stay in crappy hotels on weekends and holidays sometimes 5 day in a row per week.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:58 AM
  #5030  
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Default Systems knowledge v button pushing

Exerpt from the Crew Survival Study published by NASA following the Columbia crash. A fitting epitaph for an aviator, rather than something like "QRH guidance was insufficient"

"It was a very short time," Hale said. "We know it was very disorienting motion that was going on. There were a number of alarms that went off simultaneously. And the crews, of course, are trained to maintain or regain control in a number of different ways and we have evidence from (recovered debris that they) were trying very hard to regain control. We're talking about a very brief time, in a crisis situation, and I'd hate to go any further than that."

Said Melroy: "I'd just like to add we found that those actions really showed the crew was relying on their training in problem solving and problem resolution and that they were focused on attempting to recover the vehicle when they did detect there was something off nominal. They showed remarkable systems knowledge and problem resolution techniques. Unfortunately, of course, there was no way for them to know with the information they had that that was going to be impossible. But we were impressed with the training, certainly, and the crew."
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